Ketamine – small doses work in depression and bipolar disorder

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Everyone is very edgy right now with depression. Media is sensationalizing, which is the worst thing to do. I even hesitate to write this now.

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Ketamine really does work

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Small doses may be all that’s needed. Even large doses are safe.

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Two Cases

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I hate to play on emotion that is strong right now, but Robin Williams might be alive today if his doctors prescribed ketamine nasal spray.

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Every one, doctors and patients alike, worry about ketamine. It sells newspaper headlines and distorted media coverage that then overtakes the life saving stories of its profound safety when used under good medical supervision. Experience helps.

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Two cases from yesterday and today really must be shared. These two patients would not be alive today if they did not have ketamine nasal spray for their depression.

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I don’t mean to say every one will respond to these extremely tiny doses, but it’s always exciting to hear the effective dose is simply so small.

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These details would make good case reports if time permitted, but there is never enough time. I wanted simply to say a few things now because these two patients were seen.

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**1**

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In May 2014, saw a fifty-ish woman who is now responding to 20 mg (4 nasal sprays) given as one dose every 48 hours. She has been treated at well known university psychiatry departments, failed ECT 9 or 10 times – memory loss was so bad she got lost in her own neighborhood. Received IV ketamine once or twice weekly for one year before I saw her.

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Diagnoses:  dysthymia as long as she can remember, and 25 years of Major Depressive Disorder, PTSD, anxiety, etc. Olympic level athlete —

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**2**

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Second patient now in late teens, Juvenile Bipolar Disorder/Fear of Harm phenotype, profound thermoregulatory changes respond in seconds to ketamine, dose of 10 mg nasal spray every 3 days. That’s it! Temperature responds in seconds, and the depression responds in 10 minutes in her case. She was so violent before treatment that she had been hospitalized 7 times in 2-1/2 years. Doing very very well. And the low dose naltrexone, by the way, is involved in thermoregulation.

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I should mention, no side effects whatsoever. I have never seen toxicity. I watch kidney and bladder function meticulously, and patients with massive pain on very high doses have never had any organ toxicity.

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NEURO-INFLAMMATION AND GLIA – brain on fire.

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I mention Olympic athlete because so many people I see with Complex Regional Pain Syndrome – the pain that so often leads to suicide, seems to occur more often in top level athletes, either state or national level, professional or sponsored in their teens. Yes, they occur in others, but there is a striking predominance in athletes for unknown reasons.

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Glia are triggered by trauma, then they become activated and produce pro-inflammatory cytokines. Inflammation is out of balance. Ketamine profoundly reduces the pro-inflammatory cytokines, and so does low dose naltrexone. I write about these mechanisms with more frequency that anything else. This is what we must address – the brain is essentially “on fire.” And this inflammation, these pro-inflammatory cytokines, are involved in almost every known disease: Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, ALS, chronic pain, major depressive disorder, cancer, autoimmune disease, and atheroscloerosis.

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Inflammation kills. Unfortunately this new research on glia and inflammatory diseases, these diseases could be called gliopathies, all based on new research since the turn of the century. We now know glia are your innate immune system in brain and spinal cord. They need a balance the anti-inflammatory cytokines with the pro-inflammatory cytokines. Inflammation may be lifesaving when you have caught a virus, but not as a steady diet. Give the brain a break or it leads to hyperexcitable glutamate that triggers calcium flooding into the neuron, cell death, brain atrophy and memory loss. Seen in people with Major Depression and those with chronic low back pain.

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Do doctors know about the innate immune system? or the receptor that won the Nobel Prize 2 and 1/2 years ago? or glia?

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Answer: no.

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Papolos et al have published Clinical experience using intranasal ketamine in the treatment of pediatric bipolar disorder/fear of harm phenotype

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Ketamine administration was associated with a substantial reduction in measures of mania, fear of harm and aggression. Significant improvement was observed in mood, anxiety and behavioral symptoms, attention/executive functions, insomnia, parasomnias and sleep inertia. Treatment was generally well-tolerated.

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Dr. Papolos’ video on treatment points out, ketamine nasal spray is off-label

for Bipolar Disorder. And I add, ketamine is off-label for pain and for major depression.

He posts this:

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PUBLIC WARNING

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Public Warning: Ketamine is a controlled substance.

Administered improperly, or without the guidance of a qualified doctor,

Ketamine may cause injury or death.

No attempt should be made to use Ketamine

in the absence of counsel from a qualified doctor.

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“Off label” means it is FDA approved for another purpose, but he prescribes it for Juvenile Bipolar Disorder. I would add that in qualified hands, ketamine is one of the safest medications we have in our formulary.

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More later, as time permits.

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

It is not a substitute for medical advice,

diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

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Please understand that it is not legal for me

to give medical advice without a consultation.

If you wish an appointment, please telephone my office.

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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Do You Have Depression? Are you the one who runs into snow wearing shorts?

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Since you were a baby, thermoregulation may be the source of the problem

that triggers your depression or the depression of someone you know.

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You may be a candidate for a research study if you have other key characteristics.

Treatment may help.

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Contact the Juvenile Bipolar Research Foundation.

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OR

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Demitri Papolos, MD, is the psychiatrist who, in collaboration with many others, has discovered that body temperature appears to be at the origin of this condition:

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Juvenile Bipolar Disorder, Fear of Harm phenotype.

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Dr. Papolos has written many publications and has published a book, with Janice Papolos, describing this serious disorder. “The Papoloses were the first to sound a national alarm about the dangers of using antidepressant and stimulant drugs with this population of children.”

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Either the link to Dr. Papolos or the Research Foundation, above, can give you further information on treatment.

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Papolos et al have published Clinical experience using intranasal ketamine in the treatment of pediatric bipolar disorder/fear of harm phenotype

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Ketamine administration was associated with a substantial reduction in measures of mania, fear of harm and aggression. Significant improvement was observed in mood, anxiety and behavioral symptoms, attention/executive functions, insomnia, parasomnias and sleep inertia. Treatment was generally well-tolerated.

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Dr. Papolos’ video on treatment points out ketamine nasal spray is off-label

for Bipolar Disorder and he posts this

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PUBLIC WARNING

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Public Warning: Ketamine is a controlled substance.

Administered improperly, or without the guidance of a qualified doctor,

Ketamine may cause injury or death.

No attempt should be made to use Ketamine

in the absence of counsel from a qualified doctor.

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“Off label” means it is FDA approved for another purpose, but he prescribes it for Juvenile Bipolar Disorder. I would add that in qualified hands, ketamine is one of the safest medications we have in our formulary.

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I am not affiliated with Dr. Papolos, but wish to call attention to the dedicated academic work they have been doing for this devastating mood disorder. .

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Of interest, thermoregulation appears to be modulated by low dose naltrexone (LDN).

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It has been anecdotally reported to relieve heat intolerance in persons with Multiple Sclerosis.

I have seen a response with Juvenile Bipolar Disorder/Fear of Harm, and

severe postmenopausal hot flashes were completely reversed by LDN.

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Naltrexone blocks the TLR4 receptor. There is a strong literature on TLR4 and temperature regulation. This raises the interesting question whether anyone has done objective studies to show that low dose naltrexone may be modulating temperature in patients. If you have experience with this, please add your comments below.

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

It is not a substitute for medical advice,

diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

~~~~~

Please understand that it is not legal for me

to give medical advice without a consultation.

If you wish an appointment, please telephone my office.

.

For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

 

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Prostate Cancer – Exercise Cuts Inflammatory Cytokines IL-6 & IL-8, reduces psychological distress

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American Society of Clinical Oncologists (ASCO) in Chicago yesterday report on exercise reducing psychological distress. Whether cancer outcome will be impacted is not yet known and will require study but inflammation may impact cancer progression.

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The usual treatments change metabolism, cause weight gain, “loss of lean muscle mass, change[s] lipids, increase[s] rates of diabetes, and it thins bones.”

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Exercise is even more critical in those undergoing hormone therapies.

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This was a small randomized study for seven weeks.

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Patients receiving usual care experienced a 0.08 log10 increase in pro-inflammatory interleukin-6 production, while patients treated with an exercise program experienced a 0.03 log10 decrease in IL-6 (P<0.05), said Charles Kamen, PhD, research assistant professor at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York.

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In his oral presentation … Kamen and colleagues observed a similar relationship with another pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-8. In the control patients, the researchers noted a 0.03 log10 increase compared with a 0.04 log10 decrease among the exercise group, Kamen said.

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Using the Profile of Mood States (POMS), the research team determined that psychological distress decreased 5.17 points among the exercise group but increased 2.43 points in the patients who were in the usual control group (P=0.02).

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“This study supports the use of exercise for cancer patients for reducing psychological distress and suggests a potential biological mechanism by which this improvement occurs, namely by reducing systemic inflammation,” Kamen said in his presentation….

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The POMS scores were overall significantly in favor of the exercise group, and the subscales all trended in favor of exercise, except for the anger subscale in which there was virtually no change, Kamen said.

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PEA Palmitoylethanolamide – “Glia & Mast Cells as Target, An Anti-Inflammatory & Neuroprotective Lipid Mediator”

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Another oustanding article on palmitoylethanolamide “PEA.” I have seen profound results with it relieving intractable neuropathic pain in a woman with CRPS for years, and I suspect it may help Major Depressive Disorder but that remains to be tested.

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I need to add that opioids create pain. One mechanism by which that occurs is that opioids create pro-inflammatory cytokines, which creates more pain. Patients may see no response to essential pain relieving medications untill they taper off all opioids and allow the system to stabilize. Otherwise, they will have pain forever and it may increase.

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Glia and mast cells as targets for palmitoylethanolamide,

an anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective lipid mediator

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Authors  Skaper SD, Facci L, Giusti P.

Mol Neurobiol. 2013 Oct;48(2):340-52.  Epub 2013 Jun 28.

Abstract

Glia are key players in a number of nervous system disorders. Besides releasing glial and neuronal signaling molecules directed to cellular homeostasis, glia respond also to pro-inflammatory signals released from immune-related cells, with the mast cell being of particular interest. A proposed mast cell-glia communication may open new perspectives for designing therapies to target neuroinflammation by differentially modulating activation of non-neuronal cells normally controlling neuronal sensitization-both peripherally and centrally. Mast cells and glia possess endogenous homeostatic mechanisms/molecules that can be upregulated as a result of tissue damage or stimulation of inflammatory responses. Such molecules include the N-acylethanolamines, whose principal family members are the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide), and its congeners N-stearoylethanolamine, N-oleoylethanolamine, and N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA). A key role of PEA may be to maintain cellular homeostasis when faced with external stressors provoking, for example, inflammation: PEA is produced and hydrolyzed by microglia, it downmodulates mast cell activation, it increases in glutamate-treated neocortical neurons ex vivo and in injured cortex, and PEA levels increase in the spinal cord of mice with chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. Applied exogenously, PEA has proven efficacious in mast cell-mediated experimental models of acute and neurogenic inflammation. This fatty acid amide possesses also neuroprotective effects, for example, in a model of spinal cord trauma, in a delayed post-glutamate paradigm of excitotoxic death, and against amyloid β-peptide-induced learning and memory impairment in mice. These actions may be mediated by PEA acting through “receptor pleiotropism,” i.e., both direct and indirect interactions of PEA with different receptor targets, e.g., cannabinoid CB2 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha.

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Ketamine Nasal Spray for Major Depression – The First Randomized Controlled Trial

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A Randomized Controlled Trial of Intranasal Ketamine in Major Depressive Disorder

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Psychiatrists from Mt. Sinai in New York this month have published the first randomized controlled trial of intranasal ketamine showing it is safe, well tolerated, and rapidly effective in treating symptoms of depression in persons with Major Depressive Disorder.

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This is a small study of 18 patients with treatment resistant depression showing a significant antidepressant effect occurred as early as 40 minutes in some. 44% responded after 24 hours compared to 6% placebo. Ketamine was significantly different from placebo at 40 minutes, 240 minutes, and 48 hours, but not separable from placebo at 72 hours or 7 days thought they were still better. And ketamine was significant at improving anxiety symptoms at 24 hours. There were no clinically significant changes in heart rate or blood pressure and all changes resolved in four hours. “No serious adverse events occurred.”

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“Intranasal ketamine was well tolerated with only very minimal increases in dissociation, psychosis-like symptoms or hemodynamic parameters.” They felt these very minimal behavioral side effects and insignificant changes in blood pressure and pulse were consistent with the lower blood levels of ketamine compared to the higher doses used in studies of IV ketamine. Bioavailability via intranasal route is reported to range from 25% to 50%.

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Their sample had an average of 4.1 ± 3.9 treatment failures, compared to 5.7 and 5.1 in previous studies – those required a minimum of 2 to 3 treatment failures to enroll. Other clinical characteristics did not differ including “duration of illness, length of current depressive episode, and history of ECT.” They allowed ongoing treatment of psychotropic medication.

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They chose a 50 mg dose based on a previous study and on the dose used in persons with a chronic pain disorder (Daniel Carr, et al 2004). It is a lower dose than the 0.5 mg/kg dosage commonly given intravenously. They point out one limitation of the study was the use of the single dose and a standardized protocol, which did not allow them to study optimal dosing. Future study is needed to address optimal dosing, relapse prevention and scheduling of treatment.

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The minimal side effects shown in their study correlates well with my experience. I find the effective dose of ketamine is idiosyncratic. That means it is unpredictable and specific only to that individual. Large males may need only the smallest dose, and tiny elderly females may require far higher doses. That may account for the higher response rate that I believe I am seeing, however, I have not tracked percentage of responders. I have not seen toxicity in years of prescribing either for intractable pain or treatment resistant depression. Importantly, in my opinion, relapse prevention must address not only different neurotransmitters but also neuroinflammation, pro-inflammatory cytokines.

 

 

 

 

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Oxytocin, Astrocytes, Modification of Amygdala Circuits and Pain – IASP Early Research Career Grant Report

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As a physician who prescribes Oxytocin [OT] and sees profound relief of many forms of intractable pain and/or relief of treatment refractory Major Depressive Disorder or Anxiety and Panic Disorder, this research on mechanisms is deeply meaningful and long awaited. Oxytocin is a hormone made in the brain, but also in the heart and other organs in women and men. It is rare to find work on glia and oxytocin.

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Today the International Association for Study of Pain announced the final report from their 2012 Early Research Career Grant:

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“Dr. Alexander Charlet of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) in Strasbourg, France, has submitted his final report for his project “Involvement of astrocytes in the endogenous oxytocin modification of amygdala microcircuits….”

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“Dr. Charlet’s project focuses on the functional consequences of endogenous OT release in amygdala microcircuits on nociception and pain. In addition, he aims to decipher the precise mechanism, cellular and molecular, by which OT exerts its action. Thus, the purposes of his project are to characterize in vivo and in vitro the effects of endogenous OT in the amygdala on pain-related symptoms….

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.….”In addition, he was surprised to discover that perceptions of his project’s importance grew once it was awarded and triggered future collaborations: a Marie Curie European Action Career Integration Grant and the French Initiative d’Excellence Attractivity.”

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“As a result, Dr. Charlet also received two major personal prizes: an award from Swiss Society for Biological Psychiatry in 2012 and award from the French Académie nationale de medicine with the prestigious Albert Sézary price in 2013. Finally, he has been recruited as a neurosciences permanent researcher by the CNRS and recently opened his independent lab.”

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

~~~~~

Please understand that it is not legal for me

to give medical advice without a consultation.

If you wish an appointment, please telephone my office.

.

For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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