PEA Palmitoylethanolamide – “Glia & Mast Cells as Target, An Anti-Inflammatory & Neuroprotective Lipid Mediator”


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Another oustanding article on palmitoylethanolamide “PEA.” I have seen profound results with it relieving intractable neuropathic pain in a woman with CRPS for years, and I suspect it may help Major Depressive Disorder but that remains to be tested.

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I need to add that opioids create pain. One mechanism by which that occurs is that opioids create pro-inflammatory cytokines, which creates more pain. Patients may see no response to essential pain relieving medications untill they taper off all opioids and allow the system to stabilize. Otherwise, they will have pain forever and it may increase.

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Glia and mast cells as targets for palmitoylethanolamide,

an anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective lipid mediator

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Authors  Skaper SD, Facci L, Giusti P.

Mol Neurobiol. 2013 Oct;48(2):340-52.  Epub 2013 Jun 28.

Abstract

Glia are key players in a number of nervous system disorders. Besides releasing glial and neuronal signaling molecules directed to cellular homeostasis, glia respond also to pro-inflammatory signals released from immune-related cells, with the mast cell being of particular interest. A proposed mast cell-glia communication may open new perspectives for designing therapies to target neuroinflammation by differentially modulating activation of non-neuronal cells normally controlling neuronal sensitization-both peripherally and centrally. Mast cells and glia possess endogenous homeostatic mechanisms/molecules that can be upregulated as a result of tissue damage or stimulation of inflammatory responses. Such molecules include the N-acylethanolamines, whose principal family members are the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide), and its congeners N-stearoylethanolamine, N-oleoylethanolamine, and N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA). A key role of PEA may be to maintain cellular homeostasis when faced with external stressors provoking, for example, inflammation: PEA is produced and hydrolyzed by microglia, it downmodulates mast cell activation, it increases in glutamate-treated neocortical neurons ex vivo and in injured cortex, and PEA levels increase in the spinal cord of mice with chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. Applied exogenously, PEA has proven efficacious in mast cell-mediated experimental models of acute and neurogenic inflammation. This fatty acid amide possesses also neuroprotective effects, for example, in a model of spinal cord trauma, in a delayed post-glutamate paradigm of excitotoxic death, and against amyloid β-peptide-induced learning and memory impairment in mice. These actions may be mediated by PEA acting through “receptor pleiotropism,” i.e., both direct and indirect interactions of PEA with different receptor targets, e.g., cannabinoid CB2 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha.

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Ketamine Nasal Spray for Major Depression – The First Randomized Controlled Trial


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A Randomized Controlled Trial of Intranasal Ketamine in Major Depressive Disorder

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Psychiatrists from Mt. Sinai in New York this month have published the first randomized controlled trial of intranasal ketamine showing it is safe, well tolerated, and rapidly effective in treating symptoms of depression in persons with Major Depressive Disorder.

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This is a small study of 18 patients with treatment resistant depression showing a significant antidepressant effect occurred as early as 40 minutes in some. 44% responded after 24 hours compared to 6% placebo. Ketamine was significantly different from placebo at 40 minutes, 240 minutes, and 48 hours, but not separable from placebo at 72 hours or 7 days thought they were still better. And ketamine was significant at improving anxiety symptoms at 24 hours. There were no clinically significant changes in heart rate or blood pressure and all changes resolved in four hours. “No serious adverse events occurred.”

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“Intranasal ketamine was well tolerated with only very minimal increases in dissociation, psychosis-like symptoms or hemodynamic parameters.” They felt these very minimal behavioral side effects and insignificant changes in blood pressure and pulse were consistent with the lower blood levels of ketamine compared to the higher doses used in studies of IV ketamine. Bioavailability via intranasal route is reported to range from 25% to 50%.

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Their sample had an average of 4.1 ± 3.9 treatment failures, compared to 5.7 and 5.1 in previous studies – those required a minimum of 2 to 3 treatment failures to enroll. Other clinical characteristics did not differ including “duration of illness, length of current depressive episode, and history of ECT.” They allowed ongoing treatment of psychotropic medication.

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They chose a 50 mg dose based on a previous study and on the dose used in persons with a chronic pain disorder (Daniel Carr, et al 2004). It is a lower dose than the 0.5 mg/kg dosage commonly given intravenously. They point out one limitation of the study was the use of the single dose and a standardized protocol, which did not allow them to study optimal dosing. Future study is needed to address optimal dosing, relapse prevention and scheduling of treatment.

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The minimal side effects shown in their study correlates well with my experience. I find the effective dose of ketamine is idiosyncratic. That means it is unpredictable and specific only to that individual. Large males may need only the smallest dose, and tiny elderly females may require far higher doses. That may account for the higher response rate that I believe I am seeing, however, I have not tracked percentage of responders. I have not seen toxicity in years of prescribing either for intractable pain or treatment resistant depression. Importantly, in my opinion, relapse prevention must address not only different neurotransmitters but also neuroinflammation, pro-inflammatory cytokines.

 

 

 

 

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Vulvodynia & proctodynia treated with topical baclofen 5 % & palmitoylethanolamide


 

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Vulvodynia and proctodynia (rectal pain) treated with topical baclofen 5 % and palmitoylethanolamide

Abstract

Background

The prevalence of idiopathic vulvodynia and proctodynia is high. Pain management with anti-depressants and anti-epileptics may induce undesirable side effects. Therefore, topical baclofen cream and palmitoylethanolamide might be new therapeutic options.

Case

A 33-year-old woman with intractable chronic vulvar and anal pain had to abstain from sexual intercourse and could neither cycle nor sit for more than 5 min. The patient did not respond to standard treatments. We prescribed a combination of topical baclofen 5 % and palmitoylethanolamide 400 mg, three times daily. After 3 months her symptoms decreased more than 50 % and sexual intercourse was possible again without pain.

Conclusion

Topical baclofen and palmitoylethanolamide can be a viable treatment option in chronic vulvodynia and proctodynia.

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I have been very pleased with palmitoylethanolamide for neuropathic pain. It is made in the brain and by plants and I have never seen toxicity. PJ’s Prescription Shoppe imports it from the Netherlands for my patients, and it is available in a capsule as a food supplement called PeaPure, without prescription. I have posted on it and its mechanisms a few times elsewhere on this website.

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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