CRPS Research Funded by RSDS: An Exploratory Study of Genetic, Epigenetic, Proteomic, Metabolomic, and Gene Expression- Related Factors in CRPS


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An Exploratory Study of Genetic,

Epigenetic, Proteomic, Metabolomic, and

Gene Expression- Related Factors in CRPS

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This is one of several studies funded by RSDS. Click on the blue link above to read the full announcement, page 15 of their newsletter today.

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It is always exciting to see what the nonprofit Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome Asssociation does with the money donated to them and then chosen for awards by their distinguished board of scientific advisors.

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Please donate to RSDSA.

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Use the links at top of this page if you like, or their website, but please donate. No one else is actively funding research on Complex Regional Pain Syndrome – research that applies to all forms of neuropathic pain. .It takes constant effort, fund raising and awareness.

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Please donate and ask others to donate to RSDSA.

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If you know anyone with pain, not only pain from CRPS but any pain, please donate. Remember it is almost a certainty that one day you or someone you love will one day have pain. Treatment for chronic intractable pain applies to everyone, not just those with CRPS. Can you spare $4.00 for a coffee? Donate that.

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“In June 2015, the RSDSA awarded a $57,000 grant to Vanderbilt University Medical Center Professor Stephen Bruehl to conduct a study to discover possible genetic and molecular factors related to CRPS.”

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“Why do some develop CRPS and others do not, despite experiencing similar injuries?”.

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“… Dr. Bruehl will analyze a vast amount of highly detailed genetic, protein-related, and metabolism-related information collected as part of a previously completed Department of Defense research study of 116 military veterans experiencing CRPS and non-CRPS pain following traumatic injuries that required limb amputation. This information has never previously been examined.

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Specifically, Dr. Bruehl and his team will study whether development of CRPS rather than non-CRPS limb pain (or no pain) after amputation is linked to differences in:

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  •  genetics (particularly in genes not previously explored for CRPS risk)
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  • gene expression (whether certain genes are turned on or off)
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  • epigenetic regulation (nonpermanent modifications to genes that govern their activity)
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  • the proteins that make up the body
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  • and how chemicals are metabolized (processed) by the body.

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Dr. Bruehl’s team will also test whether severity of CRPS symptoms is associated with these factors.”

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.
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It is not legal for me to provide medical advice without an examination.

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It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided

by a qualified health care provider.

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This site is not for email and not for appointments.

If you wish an appointment, please telephone the office to schedule.

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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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