Rectal Suppository Morphine, part 3 – cannabis


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Let’s all now avoid the topic of cannabis.

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How am I and other physicians, without research, supposed to help someone with insomnia caused by pain that takes the blood pressure to 220/110, with intense nausea.

That kind of pain.

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CDC suggests Tylenol and aspirin. That’s it folks.

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There is only one politician discussing cannabis.

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And please, don’t force researchers to use that stale dry brown stuff that NIDA sends to researchers.

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If any questions, please schedule an appointment with my office.

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment

provided by a qualified health care provider.

Relevant comments are welcome.

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3 Responses to “Rectal Suppository Morphine, part 3 – cannabis”

  1. Bob Schubring Says:

    Thanks for that reminder, Dr Sajben. Pain that interferes with a vital function of the body, such as the blood pressure and sleep, is inherently a health hazard. Treating it is necessary, even though the treatment is risky and imperfect in certain respects.

    Chronic severe pain that goes on for months, has a wider range of hazards, because it induces mental problems that may lead to suicide.

    The CDC have ignored this issue entirely. Instead of admitting that pain is undertreated, and that the Bush Administration’s policy of taking away pain medicine and sending pain doctors to prison, has led to an increase in suicide, the CDC have covered up this crime against humanity, by calling these forcibly-induced suicides “opioid-related deaths”. The Obama Administration are now proceeding to lock up more doctors, take away more pain medicine, and persuade more of us to kill ourselves.

  2. Jason Durnil Says:

    Dr Sajben is absolutely on point here. If we want to restrict the opioids that so many rely upon for their chronic pain we need viable alternatives. Cannabis research in the United States is heavily restricted and you are 99% more likely to be able to perform that research and get cannabis for the study if it is harm based given that it is completely controlled by the National Institute on Drug Abuse https://www.drugabuse.gov/drugs-abuse/marijuana/nidas-role-in-providing-marijuana-research. Doctors depend on a preponderance of evidence before they will rely on a given treatment and we cannot provide them that in this climate.


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