CRPS – Appendicitis treated with antibiotics can avoid surgery


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For someone who has CRPS/RSD, any trauma including surgery can severely flare CRPS and/or cause it to spread.

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A young man in his mid 20’s was headed for surgery for acute appendicitis last night. He is resolving now, 24 hours later, with IV antibiotics as I suggested. He’s the first in his hospital, a major hospital in Los Angeles.

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Dad called me last night. Mom texted me reports of CT abdomen showing thickened wall of appendix, and all labs consistent with acute bacterial appendicitis: WBC’s elevated 15.1, elevated neutrophils consistent with bacteria rather than virus. Overnight, his generalized abdominal pain is now focal and much reduced, WBC’s are ~8, well within normal range including neutrophils, and he took a good walk in hospital. By day two, WBC count was 5, normal, no elevation in neutrophils indicating brisk response to antibiotics knocking out bacteria. He’ll go home on oral antibiotics probably tomorrow. I asked and was told he has chronic constipation which begs the question if it can trigger infection because of sluggish gut.

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Treatment & References

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1. If you have CRPS, then before any procedure small, large or dental, begin minocycline, a glial modulator. It was found in animal research many years ago to prevent flare or spread of CRPS.

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2. Antibiotics IV for the bowel.

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Below is a list of articles, most from the outstanding library of the Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Association. Their vast collection of publications is organized by subject. I strongly recommend donating to them.

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Minocycline inhibits microglia activation and alters spinal Endocannabinoids

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Minocycline Neuroprotective- Johns Hopkins 2010 Archives of Neurology

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CRPS prolonged remission obtained by treatment of intestinal bacterial overgrowth. A multicenter study from Washington University in St. Louis, Stanford, Brown University.

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Effectiveness of Patient Choice in Nonoperative vs Surgical Management of Pediatric Uncomplicated Acute Appendicitis. One year prospective study from Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, JAMA December 2016. IV Antibiotics for at least one day followed by 10 days of oral antibiotics.

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“Conclusions and Relevance  When chosen by the family, nonoperative management is an effective treatment strategy for children with uncomplicated acute appendicitis, incurring less morbidity and lower costs than surgery.”

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Antibiotics alone can be a safe, effective treatment for children with appendicitis. An article from Science Daily about the Nationwide Children’s Hospital study.

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“Families who choose to treat their child’s appendicitis with antibiotics, even those who ended up with an appendectomy because the antibiotics didn’t work, have expressed that for them it was worth it to try antibiotics to avoid surgery,” said Peter C. Minneci, MD, one of the authors.

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The appendix may be an important reservoir of bacteria to populate the gut with good bugs, our healthy microbiome.

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Why don’t we see appendicitis more often in adults?

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Surgery has very real potential dangers that may include infection, abscess, pulmonary emboli, cardiac arrythmias, brain damage from loss of oxygen, death. Years later, there may be chronic abdominal pain from scarring, adhesions of bowel, leading to more surgery to lyse the adhesions. Or acute pain from infarcted bowel when needed oxygen gets choked by adhesions that cause necrosis of segments of bowel, intense pain or perforation, possible death.

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Specific to laparoscopic surgery, I have seen two patients who developed years of intractable abdominal pain from the scope itself and in 2015 there was a recall of scopes across the country that caused death and/or antibiotic resistant infections carried on segments of the scope that could not be sterilized. Another concern, during laparoscopic surgery, they blow up the abdomen under very high pressures to float the organs away from the scope. Very high pressure.

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 Constipation

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Let’s see a study to determine how often chronic constipation is present for years potentially causing the appendix to become inflamed. This young man will be taking a stool softener such as DSS or Colace (same thing), and if that doesn’t work then a prescription for Amitiza is something to consider.

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There are 70,000 surgeries for appendicitis each year in children, usually teens, more often in males. In many cases the appendage is normal and surgery unnecessary.

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Antibiotics for uncomplicated appendicitis could save lives, prevent acute and long term complications, and lower healthcare costs.

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Immune cells make appendix ‘silent hero’ of digestive health

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November 30, 2015. . .Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are crucial for protecting against bacterial infection in people with compromised immune systems, report investigators. Their work shows that a network of immune cells helps the appendix to play a pivotal role in maintaining health of the digestive system, supporting the theory that the appendix isn’t redundant.
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The research team, a collaborative partnership between the groups of Professor Gabrielle Belz of Melbourne’s Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, and Professor Eric Vivier at the Centre d’Immunologie de Marseille-Luminy, France, found that innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are crucial for protecting against bacterial infection in people with compromised immune systems.

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By preventing significant damage and inflammation of the appendix during a bacterial attack, ILCs safeguard the organ and help it to perform an important function in the body, as a natural reservoir for ‘good’ bacteria. The research is published in today’s issue of Nature Immunology.

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Professor Gabrielle Belz, a laboratory head in the institute’s Molecular Immunology division, said the study’s findings show that the appendix deserves more credit than it has historically been given.

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“Popular belief tells us the appendix is a liability,” she said. “Its removal is one of the most common surgical procedures in Australia, with more than 70,000 operations each year. However, we may wish to rethink whether the appendix is so irrelevant for our health.

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“We’ve found that ILCs may help the appendix to potentially reseed ‘good’ bacteria within the microbiome — or community of bacteria — in the body. A balanced microbiome is essential for recovery from bacterial threats to gut health, such as food poisoning.”

Professor Belz said having a healthy appendix might even save people from having to stomach more extreme options for repopulating — or ‘balancing out’ — their microbiomes.

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“In certain cases, people require reseeding of their intestines with healthy bacteria by faecal transplant — a process where intestinal bacteria is transplanted to a sick person from a healthy individual,” Professor Belz said. “Our research suggests ILCs may be able to play this important part in maintaining the integrity of the appendix.

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“We found ILCs are part of a multi-layered protective armoury of immune cells that exist in healthy individuals. So even when one layer is depleted, the body has ‘back ups’ that can fight the infection.

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“In people who have compromised immune systems — such as people undergoing cancer treatment — these cells are vital for fighting bacterial infections in the gastrointestinal system. This is particularly important because ILCs are able to survive in the gut even during these treatments, which typically wipe out other immune cells.”

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Professor Belz has previously shown that diet, such as the proteins in leafy green vegetables, could help produce ILCs. “ILCs are also known to play a role in allergic diseases, such as asthma; inflammatory bowel disease; and psoriasis,” she said. “So it is vital that we better understand their role in the intestine and how we might manipulate this population to treat disease, or promote better health.”

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It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment

provided by a qualified health care provider.

Relevant comments are welcome.

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