Heroin Addiction absent or rare in UK prescribing


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Diamorphine (heroin) is prescribed for pain in the UK . Yesterday’s LA Times Op-Ed

What’s really causing the prescription drug crisis?

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Studies show addiction to opioids of any kind, even heroin, is rare in the UK. Not what we see in the US. They have more socialized care for housing, medical care, medications including for the jobless. They do not have the hopelessness that leads to desperation and addiction. Desperation is why all patients with chronic pain must work with a psychologist. Pain is not in your head, but desperation is, and a psychologist can help you learn tools to deal with desperation. If you don’t, pain will go up, up, up and that’s what’s in your head. Unless you use those tools, I promise you will suffer because it will get worse and worse and worse.

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“Doctors in many parts of the world — including Canada and some European countries — prescribe more powerful opiates than their peers in the United States. In England, if, say, you get hit by a car, you may be given diamorphine (the medical name for heroin) to manage your pain. Some people take it for long periods. If what we’ve been told is right, they should become addicted in huge numbers.

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But this doesn’t occur. The Canadian physician Gabor Maté argues in his book “In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts” that studies examining the medicinal use of narcotics for pain relief find no significant risk of addiction. I’ve talked with doctors in Canada and Europe about this very issue. They say it’s vanishingly rare for a patient given diamorphine or a comparably strong painkiller in a hospital setting to develop an addiction.

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Given that really powerful opiates do not appear to systematically cause addiction when administered by doctors, we should doubt that milder ones do. In fact only 1 in 130 prescriptions for an opiate such as Oxycontin or Percocet in the United States results in addiction, according to the National Survey on Drug Use and Heath.

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So what’s really happening? The second, clashing story goes, again, crudely, like this: Opiate use is climbing because people feel more distressed and disconnected, and are turning to anesthetics to cope with their psychological pain.

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Addiction rates are not spread evenly across the United States, as you would expect if chemical hooks were the primary cause. On the contrary, addiction is soaring in areas such as the Rust Belt, the South Bronx and the forgotten towns of New England, where people there say they are lonelier and more insecure than they have been in living memory.”

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Healthcare costs in the US are a very serious problem. Opioids require monthly visits. Patients on opioids are forced to see a pain specialist, many for decades when pain is chronic. That’s bad enough, but the cost of opioid medications are outrageous. I know some whose opioids cost $17,000 per month or more. And some doctors in my area have mandated urine drug tests every single month, $750 per test, to prove you are not taking street drugs. High risk patients and nonaddicts alike, every month, just to pee in a cup and get your prescription opioid. 

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Now congress is getting rid of the ACA, to make it better. I can only imagine how helpful they have been. Privatize social security, privatize medicare, privatize everything. Of course that will be better for them. Will it help anyone else? 

 

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.
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It is not legal for me to provide medical advice without an examination.

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It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

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This site is not for email and not for appointments.

If you wish an appointment, please telephone the office to schedule.

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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Please IGNORE THE ADS BELOW. They are not from me.

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Pain Much Better off Opioids


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Patient disabled with CRPS/RSD markedly better after off opioids. The intense nerve pain began in his left ring finger eight years ago, not the dominant hand. Now he has pain everywhere below the neck. He has been bed-ridden for years.  Now his “bones feel like ice, freezing from the inside out and shaking.”

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Had been on Fentanyl patch 100 mcg/hr for years. Dose was lowered to 75 mcg/hr, then his pain specialist did an involuntary taper off in two short weeks. Both of those doses are far higher than the new CDC guidelines from 2016. Fentanyl is 100 times stronger than morphine.
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He says his pain is feeling much better off the opiates. He is quite surprised. On Fentanyl 100 mcg/hr patch, he rates his pain then as 6 to 8 on scale of 10.
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Pain is now  2 to 4 off opioids the last 3 to 4 weeks. Even the hands are not hurting as much..

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Initially after the abrupt taper, he spent 7 days in bed, then says he “started getting out a little bit, now hands are not hurting as much. Neuropathy even isn’t hurting as much.”

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I have seen several patients who said opioids caused pain, all over the body in places they never had pain before or since.

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Yes, clearly many are helped by opioids. But many are simply afraid to taper off. I understand this. The question then is, what will we do to treat pain? Most doctors have nothing else. Patients rightfully fear stopping opioids.

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We need to understand there is outstanding science that demonstrated years ago that opioids cause inflammation in the CNS (brain and spinal cord). Inflammation causes pain.

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Treat pain with glial modulators that relieve inflammation in the brain, neuroinflammation. These are off label and most of them must be compounded. Compounded medications are not covered by your insurance — thanks to pharmaceutical donations to congress.

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Cannabis (medical marijuana) can help some with spasm, pain, insomnia. Also not covered by your insurance — thanks to pharmaceutical donations to congress. But patients in New Mexico were able to get insurers to reimburse them for the cost of their medical cannabis.  Congress should allow dispensaries free access to banking systems and allow insurers to directly pay the cost for medical use. We all know the emperor has no clothes. Lets be real. Pain leads to desperate measures.

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Let me say right now, to all those who will send in comments attacking science, attacking me, attacking my clinical experience (my patient reports) on opioids, I will not post your attacks on these pages. I do prescribe opioids to select patients. I strongly believe all pain should be treated initially by glial modulators that relieve neuroinflammation before we begin causing pain and inflammation by ultimately having nothing else to turn to and then prescribe opioids. There is no better solution because pharma wants you on a drug for life. That’s money in the bank, forever, every single month for decades. It’s awful.

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.
.
It is not legal for me to provide medical advice without an examination.

.
It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

~~
This site is not for email and not for appointments.

If you wish an appointment, please telephone the office to schedule.

~~~~~

For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

.

Please IGNORE THE ADS BELOW. They are not from me.

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