John Muir’s Ecstatic Experience of the Sierras: The Sierra. Mountains holy as Sinai.


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“Muir‘s view of the natural world is strikingly contemporary–a holistic vision of an intricately interconnected “Earth-Planet Universe.“ It is also deeply spiritual and essentially pantheistic. Muir introduces us to “plant people,“ “animal people,“ and in a passage from 1872 he muses:

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The Sierra. Mountains holy as Sinai. No mountains I know of are so alluring. None so hospitable, kindly, tenderly inspiring. It seems strange that everyone does not come at their call. They are given, like the Gospel, without money and without price. “‘Tis heaven alone that is given away.“
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Here is a calm so deep, grasses cease waving… Wonderful how completely everything in the wild nature fits into us, as if truly part and parent of us. The sunshine is not on us but in us. The rivers flow not past, but through us, thrilling, tingling, vibrating every fiber and cell of the substance of our bodies, making them glide and sing. The trees wave and the flowers bloom in our bodies as well as our souls, and every bird song, windsong, and tremendous storm song of the rocks in the heart of the mountains is our song, our very own, and sings our love.”

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Muir, John of the Mountains, Ed. Linnie Marsh Wolfe, (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1938) page 92.

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From Gary Snyder and Tom Killian: The High Sierra of California, page 16  
every page fills you with such beauty.
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