Symptoms in Kids of Novel Coronavirus, COVID-19


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New paper released early due to importance.

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Coronavirus looks different in kids than in adults.

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A study released this week in the journal Pediatrics provides the clearest confirmation yet that coronavirus infections are, in fact, generally less severe in kids, with more than 90 percent of 2,143 children in the study in China having mild to moderate disease or even being asymptomatic.

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But it contains worrisome information about one subset — infants — and suggests that children may be a critical factor in the disease’s rapid spread.

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Pediatrics associate editors Andrea Cruz and Steve Zeichner, both physicians, say the study suggests “children may play a major role in community-based viral transmission.”

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The data suggests children may have more symptoms that make them contagious, like a runny nose, and that they may have more gastrointestinal symptoms, which raises concerns about the virus being in the feces for several weeks after infection.

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Adam Ratner, a doctor in pediatric infectious diseases at NYU Langone Health, said the clear takeaway from the study is that the novel coronavirus “is still something that has the ability to cause severe disease across the age spectrum.”

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Study: Coronavirus is not sparing children — and they may play a ‘major role’ in its spread..A new study shows coronavirus infections are less severe in kids, but they may spread it more readily than adults...The first thing to know is that children are getting infected across all age groups and genders. Among the patients studied, half were from Hubei Province, the epicenter of the outbreak, while the others were from bordering areas. They ranged in age from newborns to 18 with the median age being 7 years.
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So what does coronavirus look like in children?

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According to the analysis by Shanghai Children’s Medical Center researchers Yuanyuan Dong, Xi Mo and co-authors, mild cases (52 percent) were marked by the typical symptoms of a cold — fever, fatigue, cough, sore throat, runny nose and sneezing. Some patients had no fever and only digestive symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and diarrhea.

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Those with moderate infection (39 percent) had pneumonia with frequent fever and cough, mostly dry cough, followed by a wetter cough. Some had wheezing but no obvious shortness of breath.
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Severe cases were rare (5 percent) as were those who required critical care (0.4 percent.) The severe cases began with early respiratory symptoms which were sometimes accompanied by gastrointestinal issues. Around one week the children have more difficulty breathing. Those cases sometimes quickly progressed to critical illness with acute respiratory distress or failure which in turn sometimes led to other organ dysfunction — heart failure or kidney injury.
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One boy, a 14-year-old, died on Feb. 7. No further details on the patient were revealed in the study.
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Of special interest to pediatricians is a group of seven infants (11 percent of the total number of infants in the study), and two children in the age 1 to 5 range (15 percent), who progressed to critical condition. The study suggests, the authors wrote, that “young children, particularly infants, were vulnerable.”.

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The luckiest group — 4 percent — did not have any symptoms at all even as nasal or throat swabs showed they were positive for coronavirus infection…..................

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.
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It is not legal for me to provide medical advice without an examination.

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It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

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