Cannabis risk, death from fungal infection, demanding peer reviewed science. Not even billions can buy CBD if it is classed as Schedule I


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“IMPROVING MICROBIAL DETECTION STANDARDS FOR CANNABIS”

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The full article in O’Shaunessy’s is recommended. I’ve extracted a few parts.

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“If the government is going to tax us, in return they’ve got to provide us with needed services. And that means well-equipped analytic test labs run by disinterested technicians.” [emphasis mine]

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“Let’s make measured changes before another patient is harmed while demanding peer reviewed science is used to guide the regulatory process. In an era of fake news, science by press release with “beliefs” derived from companies that have a vested interest in seeing more cannabis safety testing should be hyper scrutinized.”

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“I think the cannabis-testing labs should be operated by the Department of Public Health, overseen by Commissioner Raber (and equally proficient chemists in every city and state) and staffed by well trained and well paid technicians whose pensions are secure.”

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The importance is that many patients who are immunosuppressed use medical marijuana, and need to use it safely because nothing else helps as well, including those who are immunosuppressed and don’t know it. For example, many do not know that diabetics are immunosuppressed. Those with autoimmune diseases, chronic renal disease, may be using medical cannabis and should demand testing be done with their taxed dollars as should we all. This has been one of the most useful herbs in history, for thousands of years, and can give balm and relief even to shattered nerves, especially now that healthcare insurers are denying to pay for pharma’s gobsmacking overnight billious costs.

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gobsmacking billious costs

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getting up to speed on legal cannabis &

 research on endocannabinoid systems

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This is a timely issue. Discuss with your doctor, get your representatives to help to legalize it nationwide. It may be the only thing that can help, or the only one that doesn’t constipate or cause erectile dysfunction or interact with other drugs. We don’t want our medication infected, even if we want to use cannabis for relaxation and pleasure. The Xanax’s and Ativan’s could be improved upon if only the right science is funded.

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“On February 7, the Daily Mail reported a cancer patient in northern California died from a fungal infection that authorities suspect was caused by the inhalation of contaminated medical cannabis.”

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snip

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“Furthermore, molecular techniques can be used to assess whether this cancer patient’s infection was actually cannabis derived. This is possible by using PCR and sequencing as performed by Remington et al. on the cannabis material and on the patient to confirm such an event.”

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“Rather than jumping to conclusions from a news story about cannabis contamination (which may in fact be the case), officials should confirm, via molecular methods, that a fatal infection occurred from the consumption of contaminated Cannabis or from another source, such as a hospital acquired infection. Once confirmed, the scientific data can help drive the appropriate regulations forward to ensure patient safety.  Unfortunately, most regulations passed to date for microbial detection do not appropriately address patient safety and often suggest the use of antiquated, inaccurate technologies.  For instance, we have peer-reviewed evidence that the currently accepted 48-hour Petrifilm-based method currently in use fails to detect some of the most harmful microbes found on cannabis. The State of Colorado has recently come to similar conclusions and has moved their Petrifilm detection times from 48 hours to 60-72 hours while referencing a paper suggesting 120 hours may be required.  And even with these adjustments to the regulations, Petrifilms will never give as accurate results as PCR.” [emphasis mine]

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“All technologies used to ensure product quality and patient safety should be peer reviewed. DNA-based methods are imperative to patient safety, as they are accepted, peer reviewed, and have been used for decades in other industries for similar purposes.”

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Kits to perform qPCR-based microbial testing on cannabis are commercially available at medicinalgenomics.com. We hold the largest sequence database of microbes found on cannabis and have kits that perform these tests in hours as opposed to days.”
[emphasis mine]

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“The technology exists to ensure safer cannabis for patients. Let’s make measured changes before another patient is harmed while demanding peer reviewed science is used to guide the regulatory process. In an era of fake news, science by press release with “beliefs” derived from companies that have a vested interest in seeing more cannabis safety testing should be hyper scrutinized. This extends to our own work at Medicinal Genomics and underscores our publication history in this space.”

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snip

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O’Shaughnessy’s retro message:

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Medicinal Genomics’s qPCR technology is undoubtedly superior and would have picked up the aspergillus that may have been fatal to the California  patient. But how widespread is the danger, really? In San Francisco in the ’90s, many thousands of AIDS patients whose immune systems were beyond “compromised” smoked untested crude herb, and I only heard of one rumored instance in which aspergillus may have been involved in a death. Donald Abrams, MD, might be able to confirm or correct my reassuring recollection.”

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“That said, of course the labs testing cannabis should employ the best available technology. The question, is who should pick up the tab?” [emphasis mine]

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“When I was working for the San Francisco District Attorney in ’01 or ’02 I called on Josh Bamberger at the city health department on Grove Street and asked if their lab would take on the testing of cannabis being sold at dispensaries. He said he didn’t have the budget or the personnel.  In the years ahead I was surprised that nobody from the movement/industry ever made the demand —not even the request— that a government agency take responsibility for testing medical cannabis. No patient advocate declared, “If the government is going to tax us, in return they’ve got to provide us with needed services. And that means well-equipped analytic test labs run by disinterested technicians.” [emphasis mine]

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“All around the world, PRIVATIZATION is the overwhelming socioeconomic trend of our time.  The Power Elite have done such a thorough job of selling off the commons and undermining the public sector that everybody now simply assumes that for-profit labs can and should take on the responsibility of protecting public health. “

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“I think the cannabis-testing labs should be operated by the Department of Public Health, overseen by Commissioner Raber (and equally proficient chemists in every city and state) and staffed by well trained and well paid technicians whose pensions are secure. And while we’re at it, how about free public education and single-payer medical care?”

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I keep getting the suspicion billions are being funneled rapidly down new rabbit holes using fear to prevent science. We must be able to do more than just prescribe  opioids for severe pain. Opioids cause inflammation which causes more pain. Cannabis is anti-inflammatory, analgesic, etc etc etc, and not allowed in hospitals, SNFs, or in facilities that seniors can only dream of retiring to when they can no longer manage at home. We need medical better choices.

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Medicinal cannabis is a healing plant with cannabinoids like ones that your body makes that helps you feel healthy and somehow influences the immune system more than any other system, while also lifting mood. Wouldn’t it be nice to know? It has 400 chemicals, not just two synthetic ones pharma makes. An exciting new cosmos in the body’s realm of more than just neuroscience. We have more cannabinoid receptors than any other kind in our body. We need to learn.
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Stop this Schedule I nonsense. Legalize cannabis. Privatize and regulate it like big alcohol, but keep it apart from big pharma, and endow strong university ties. For pete’s sake, fund the research immediately. We need it. The immune system needs it. The pain matrix needs it. Why should we allow euthanasia when we can treat pain and symptoms. Grandmothers used to know how. We are living in the dark ages with cannabinoid systems science. It is in starving infancy, Israel’s Mechoulam lab pioneering this blossoming for decades.
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Don’t forget to tell your representatives that you hear you may benefit from medical marijuana. Cannabis, marijuana, just may help, as it helped so many little children having hundreds of seizures each day, helped by just one of the cannabinoids in the plant: CBD.  It has been reported to almost completely stop the hundreds of daily seizures in possibly 50% —wouldn’t it be important to do research on it?

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CBD  has no psychoactive power. There is no high, no hallucinations. It actually blocks the psychoactive power of THC. It should be legal. The plant should be legal. It helps many medical conditions. I have posted an astonishing case months ago 100% relief with CBD. Instead it, just the other day, CBD got clearly classified as Schedule I. This must go to the courts. This insanity about a healing plant can be sanely managed, just like alcohol is managed. Without privatized prison systems that waste taxpayer dollars.

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We see new funnels of big money going down the rabbit hole. The urgency to privatize. We have a lot of people who cannot afford the American medical system, cannot afford doctors, who may get some relief even as a muscle relaxant or for sleep or anxiety.

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How can anyone respect a legal system that does not even allow research on a healing plant so important to the immune system?

 

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No amount of billions can buy CBD if it is classed as Schedule I.

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.
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It is not legal for me to provide medical advice without an examination.
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It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.
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If you wish an appointment, please telephone the office to schedule.
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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Please IGNORE THE ADS BELOW. They are not from me.
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Cannabis Politics, Science and Healing – O’Shaunessy’s


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O’Shaughnessy’s | The Journal of Cannabis in Clinical Practice

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Medicine is an endlessly evolving field. My patients deserve better. We have such limited tools.

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One medication has been excluded from study and from native use and understanding for decades. Libraries, seeds, plants, doctors, and lives have been destroyed. Cannabinoid receptors have been found in creatures as old as algae. You have more in your body than any other type. Think immune system and cardiovascular system and bone. Bone. Too bad we know nothing about it.

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I will give you several examples, below, why this journal is important. Laws are being written behind closed doors. Lawmakers are blocking enormous cost effective progress in medicine, not least of which is the ability to use a plant for stress and relaxation that your body has never been able to do without its help. What they are doing.

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Disclaimer: I have written recommendations for cannabis for fewer than 10 patients in 41 years of medicine. Cannabis is one of the world’s oldest and most valuable medications. There are people who should not use cannabis, especially a risk for those with mood disorder, cardiac arrhythmias, heart attack, stroke.

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O’Shaunessy’s is not a fluff journal for medicine or politics. It’s been a brutal fight for people who want to or need to use cannabis for its many benefits. Brutal for many doctors, for hospice patients, for anyone with medical needs who want a choice to use a plant rather than synthetic drugs, and those who want a different way to relax and enjoy time away from work without having to use alcohol. And for those who cannot afford more. Heaven forbid you should not grow to help others, even if they are too old or disabled to do it themselves.

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O’Shaunessy’s has several new articles on CBD, including how Senator Mitch McConnell got DEA to allow Kentucky farmers to grow hemp [high CBD].

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As lawmakers prepare the latest restrictions on use of medical cannabis behind closed doors, restrictions may prevent the best known California cannabis doctors from practicing. Those are the ones with most to teach after  years of clinical experience caring for patients with this ancient medication that has been used as well for spiritual purposes, creativity and relaxation.

270-member Society of Cannabis Clinicians protests aspects of the guidelines

Fred Gardner’s journal O’Shaughnessy’s has carried in-depth coverage of the most important issues for years.

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Fred reports on the laws and lawmakers who look at high volume cannabis practices. They should also look at high volume psychiatry. It’s required of psychiatrists at university clinics to dispense 2 to 5 or more antipsychotic drugs to psychotic patients —-one complex patient every 10 minutes.  Volume psychiatry mills. That is the standard for disabled patients who cannot afford more, a place to monitor and refill pills. Psychiatrists who have no choice or just starting in practice work there, high volume with the most dangerous drugs to the most dangerous unstable population we have. Toxic drugs in complex combinations on unstable patients. Next patient every 10 minutes.

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Why should a person who has anxiety not be able to choose – with a physician of their choice, especially a physician who is familiar with or at least not close minded – to test if cannabis helps better than Xanax . Especially when Xanax is known to cause Alzheimer’s disease, depression, addiction, and potential  overdose.

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Consider, if pain causes anxiety, is it better for a patient who is prescribed an opioid for chronic pain to add Xanax that increases risk of overdose? or cannabis that is also anti-inflammatory and can be used to help sleep when pain is too severe?

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Which would be better after major surgery: an opioid that causes inflammation and suppresses respiration or cannabis that reduces inflammation and pain? Don’t worry, we will never be allowed to test it in hospital, but people are known to sneak in canisters of tea or milk and patients need less opioid so their lungs and brains are not sedated, they can breathe, breathe much more deeply thus lower risk of pneumonia.

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Conundrum

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Consider, if you had failed spine surgery and cannabis gave some relief from spasm and pain and insomnia but nothing else had helped. It took years of hard work every month with pain specialists, nothing else worked. Genetic testing confirms. One patient had double mastectomy and later surgery for oophorectomy with no opioids — they simply didn’t work. What if, in your case, there’s a bad history of alcoholism that destroyed your family. You don’t want to risk opioid addiction but you need big surgery. You cannot get pre-operative clearance for cannabis from your cardiologist even though it is the only thing that helps you. Families risk cardiovascular problems when they sneak it in to hospital — we’ve all heard those stories for decades.

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And no, absolutely do not think I am advising you to take cannabis. That is likely against the law, just like it is against the law to tell a patient where to purchase cannabis safely, at respected sources in ratios of CBD to THC. I do not advise you to take cannabis to hospital, just because that was legal in Israel years ago, as long as conditions were met. Some people choose not to take opioids for hospice or near death.

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Would you rather live in an ICU doped up on opioids and Valium on a respirator or surreptiously taking cannabis when cardiologists do not know what is causing the cardiac arrhythmia —- cardiovascular potential, think THC.

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O’Shaunessy’s covers new dangers that lie ahead for doctors who prescribe. Story from O’Shaughnessy’s, below, on behind the scenes maneuvering of lawmakers.

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And rays of hope, like CBD for epilepsy in children, Fred interviews the team from GW Pharmaceuticals, UCSF, NYU Medical School, and presents the data from neurology meetings.

From the CBD article:

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proved beneficial in animal studies —and
for which Epidiolex [GW Pharmacuetical’s CBD] has been given orphan
drug status— is Neonatal Hypoxic-
Ischemic Encephatopathy, or NHIE (brain
damage caused by oxygen deprivation during
delivery).

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“In neonatal hypoxic-ischemia,” says
GW chairman Geoffrey Guy, MD, “you’ve
got an underlying inflammatory process
which is massively exaggerated by excitotoxicity
after each seizure, which is setting
up the next seizure in a way. It’s not enough
to treat just the seizures without treating
the underlying inflammatory encephalitis
and the damage to neuroplasticity.
“Children’s brains are very plastic and
can usually work around issues, but if
you’re having continuing seizures and
continuing inflammation, that ability will
be dampened. We’re hoping from the preclinical
work that cannabidiol will address
a number of these different issues, not just

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“There is evidence that the Federation of State Medical Boards is a shill for Big PhRMA. Starting in the 1990s, the FSMB, with funding from opioid manufacturers, pushed less restrictive prescribing guidelines that contributed to the current epidemic of addiction and death by overdose.”

Story from O’Shaughnessy’s, below

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How Senator Mitch McConnell got DEA to allow Kentucky farmers to grow hemp [high CBD]. They now lead the nation in producing CBD yet in California, DEA was allowed to raid and destroy the entire production of CBD capsules from California, one day after showing its high standards to city officials. CBD can stop one type of epileptic seizures in some children who have hundreds of seizures per day: Charlotte’s Web. Story from O’Shaughnessy’s.

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The little I know of cannabis, I owe to the instantly helpful, amazing Fred Gardner, who founded O’Shaughnessy’s. Thank you for your help, your investigative work, your connections, your life’s work, Fred. Wikipedia forgot to mention he was in medical school.

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Wikipedia says

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Fred Gardner is an American political organizer and author best known for his opposition to the Vietnam War and his writings about the medical mariijuana movement in the United States.

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Gardner received his bachelor’s degree from Harvard in 1963. He has been an editor at Scientific American, a private detective, a songwriter, an author, a freelance journalist, one of the credited screenwriters for Zabriskie Point directed by Michelangelo Antonioni, the owner of Variety Home Video, the editor of Synapse (the UCSF Medical Center student newspaper), and Public Information Officer for the San Francisco District Attorney’s office under Terence Hallinan.

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In the fall of 1967 Gardner, with Donna Mickleson and Deborah Rossman, started a coffeehouse in Columbia, South Carolina, that became a hang-out for GIs, an alternative USO called the UFO (United Freedom Organization). Gardner covered the court martial of 27 GIs charged with mutiny at the Presidio of San Francisco in October 1968 and wrote a book about the case, The Unlawful Concert, published by Viking in 1970 and reissued by Gryphon Press in 2005.

In April 1970, Gardner worked as a stage manager for Free The Army (FTA) with actors Jane Fonda and Donald Sutherland. This travelling road show for soldiers was meant to counter USO shows put on by Bob Hope. Gardner is a frequent contributor to CounterPunch. He is a long-time contributor to the Anderson Valley Advertiser.

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In 2003, Gardner launched O’Shaughnessy’s Journal of Cannabis in Clinical Practice, a journal in which doctors of the Society of Cannabis Clinicians, monitoring cannabis use by patients could share their findings and observations, and be kept abreast of relevant scientific and political developments. Martin A. Lee has been associate editor since 2009.

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Gardner currently lives in Alameda, California with his wife Marci. He has six sons and a daughter.

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The journal is doing important investigative journalism, to name just a few from :

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O’Shaunessy’s Winter 2015/2016 Print Edition

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CBDiaryHow we broke the cannabidiol story —and the ongoing ramifications.

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Off-Topic is the context in which marijuana prohibition exists —a vast terrain full of contradictions and treacherous peaks and canyons where “Cannabis activists” are told by “Reform leaders” not to stray.

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Going digital is still new for O’Shaunessy’s:

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A Work in Progress

Building this site
in plain sight
we cite Bertolt Brecht—

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“And please make
my curtain half-height, don’t cut the stage off.
Let the spectators leaning back
notice the busy preparations being made
so ingeniously for them, a metallic moon
comes swinging down, a shingle roof
is carried in; don’t show them too much
but show them something. And let them observe
that this is not magic but
work, my friends.”

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 From O’Shaunessy’s Winter 2015/16 issue on CBD

CBD is the non psychoactive cannabinoid in the plant that has at least 86 cannabinoids. It blocks THC

“Many farmers are doing ‘dual harvest,’Boucher explained. “If you’re growing for fiber, are you going to throw that CBD in
the flowers away? If you grow hemp for
seeds, why throw that CBD away? That’s
money for the farmer.”
Boucher credits Senators Mitch McConnell
and Rand Paul and Kentucky Ag Commissioner
James Comer for intervening
in 2014 when the Drug Enforcement Administration
confiscated seeds before they
could reach hemp farmers. David Bronner,
head of Dr. Bronner’s Magic Soap Company,
paid for the lawyers who got the crucial
injunction that ended the confiscation.
“McConnell made them back down last
year and this year the DEA didn’t interfere
at all,” says Boucher. “They were helpful,
in fact.”

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It was politically shrewd of McConnell,
the Senate Republican leader (and faithful
shill for the mine owners) to support the
hemp industry because he was facing a
serious challenge from a Democrat in November
2014. According to an observer of
Kentucky politics, “He would go to town
meetings and rallies, and the first question
—the first three questions— would always
be about hemp. And he’s like, ‘Wait a second,
this is a litmus test for the farmers.
If this is what they want, I’ve got to get behind this.”

behind this.’ And it was funny,
after about the second or third
rally he would say ‘Watch this,
I bet you the first question is
going to be about hemp.’ And
of course it always was.”
Kentucky farmers made
three times more per acre
growing hemp in 2015 than
growing tobacco (which used
to be government-subsidized),
according to Boucher; and 10
times more than they would
have growing corn.

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He said hemp companies were paying
“anywhere from $1,800 a ton, dry
weight—that’s barrel-bottom price—for
the top 2.5 feet of their plants.”
Companies purchasing hemp stalks plan
to make a wide range of products, from
horse bedding to fine textiles. CannaVest
donated seeds to the Growing Warriors, a
veterans group that is making American
flags from hemp. “They process it the oldtime
way,” Boucher says. “They watered
down the fibers, use an old hemp brake,
take the fiber to hand weavers.”
Boucher expects to be scaling up in the
period ahead. He foresees a market of 40
to 50 million Americans for cannabis, and
a large subset looking for CBD. CannaVest
will make tinctures and capsules marketed
as nutritional products, depending on directives
(or signals) from the DEA. “That’s
where everything’s kind of in limbo,” he
adds.

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Boucher says there are misconceptions
about the warnings sent by the FDA earlier
this year to companies that made claims attributing
curative properties to CBD, and
lied on their labels about how much CBD
their products contained. The warning was
not a blanket injunction against distribution
of CBD-rich oil, according to Boucher,
but an outing of companies making false
claims. And CannaVest was blameless.

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We sell to hundreds of different companies,
and some of those third parties were
making claims. When we sell to people, we
specifically tell them in the sales agreement
that you cannot make claims and we

 

The war on cannabis clinicians

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By Fred Gardner  July 22, 2016   The low-intensity war on cannabis clinicians —part of a long-range containment and rollback effort planned by top industry and government strategists after California voters legalized marijuana for medical use in 1996— has been heating up..

 

The Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) is now pushing guidelines that could result in cannabis clinicians being investigated based on the number of patients they’ve approved and/or number of plants authorized. The FSMB guidelines, when adopted by state boards, could also result in physicians who medicate with cannabis losing their licenses based on an assumption of impairment! [O’Shaunessy’s covered past cases of doctors who won cases brought against them by the Medical Board of California.]

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Some state medical boards and departments of public health already have adopted guidelines restricting cannabis approvals. Colorado suspended the licenses of four physicians alleged to have authorized too many patients to grow too many plants. Here is John Ingold’s report in the Denver Post.

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Next week the Medical Board of California (MBC) meets in San Francisco and one agenda item has Executive Director Kimberly Kirchmeyer leading a “Discussion on the Process to Revise the Statement on Marijuana for Medical Purposes, Marijuana Recommendations Guidelines, and a Policy on Physician Use of Marijuana.” Linked to the agenda item on the MBC’s website is the state board’s existing policy statement on “Marijuana for Medical Purposes” and the more restrictive “Model Guidelines for the Recommendation of Marijuana in Patient Care” proposed by the FSMB.

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Steve Robinson, MD, has drafted a letter to the FSMB in which the 270-member Society of Cannabis Clinicians protests aspects of the guidelines. The letter will also go to JAMA, which ran an op-ed setting forth the FSMB guidelines. Dr. Robinson thinks the Medical Board of California is on the verge of adopting the FSMB guidelines at its upcoming meeting. Kirchmeyer reassured me in an interview that next week’s procedure is just one small step towards that goal.

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The Federation of State Medical Boards is a non-profit organization consisting of one physician —Humayun Chaudhry, president and CEO — plus a staff of 180 headquartered in Euless, Texas, plus a small  Washington, DC office for their lobbyists.

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There is evidence that the Federation of State Medical Boards is a shill for Big PhRMA. Starting in the 1990s, the FSMB, with funding from opioid manufacturers, pushed less restrictive prescribing guidelines that contributed to the current epidemic of addiction and death by overdose.

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As of the 1990s, the prevailing wisdom was that opioids are highly addictive and should be prescribed only for cancer pain and short-term severe pain. But the makers of synthetic opioids such as Oxycontin (Purdue Pharma), Duragesic (Johnson & Johnson) and Percocet (Endo) had begun funding studies that minimized the risk of addiction when their drugs were used to treat longterm, non-cancer pain such as back and neck pain.

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By 2004 the Federation of State Medical Boards was pushing guidelines that encouraged a more lenient approach to opioid prescribing.  In 2012 John Fauber blew the whistle on the FSMB in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel/MedPage. The relevance of   Fauber’s expose to the current campaign against cannabis clinicians is striking. He wrote:

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The Federation of State Medical Boards, often develops guidelines that serve as the basis for model policies with the stated goal of improving medical practice —but after its guideline for the use of opioids to treat chronic pain patients was adopted as a model policy, it asked Purdue Pharmaceuticals for $100,000 to help pay for printing and distribution that policy to 700,000 practicing doctors.

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That $100,000 was just a small downpayment on the $3.1 million that the Federation’s foundation estimated it would cost for its campaign to get out the word about “safe” use of opioid analgesics in treatment of chronic pain…

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Why the FSMB would turn to a pharmaceutical company to underwrite the cost of producing and distributing a book about its opioid prescribing policy — and why the FSMB undertook developing such a policy in the first place — is part of a much larger story that has unfolded over the last decade, culminating with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s stark warning about spiraling risk of death from prescription painkillers.

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An FSMB spokesperson said there were many reasons for it to codify a position on the prescribing of opioids, and among those reasons was a project supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to seek some common ground in the treatment of chronic pain.

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[Fauber had previously reported on the University of Wisconsin Pain & Policy Studies Group receiving $2.5 million from opioid manufacturers between 1999 and 2010, starting with a $693,000 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in ’99.]

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    •    The RWJ-funded project started with an advisory committee that recruited several pain experts who had ties to makers of opioids — a core group that included J. David Hadd

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment

provided by a qualified health care provider.

Relevant comments are welcome.

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For My Home Page, click here:

Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Please be aware any advertising on this free educational website is

NOT advocated by me and NOT approved by me.

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Cannabis: CBD may help pain when rectal suppository morphine is a problem


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Marijuana, cannabis, is overlooked for pain control

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CBD – cannabidiol — is the immune/glial suppressor

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It is anti-inflammatory in brain and spinal cord

 

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Correction 3/28/16:

It is not legal to transport CBD to states where marijuana is illegal, though it has no psychoactive properties. This is explained in detail by two doctors who wrote in drugpolicy.org, March 2015. I recommend reading the article as it makes several important points.

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The cannabis plant, and everything in it, is illegal under federal law. And even in states where it is legal, it is not legal to ship cannabis products from state to state, or to leave the state with such a product.

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A recent study from Israel showed that CBD in its natural form as a whole plant extract is superior over a single, synthetic CBD compound for treating illness. The plant has continually outperformed synthetic versions in research studies.

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…There are many support groups for children with epilepsy whose parents are using medical cannabis, such as this forum run through the Epilepsy Foundation. Connecting with them can be a great resource for staying on top of the developments with CBD and the other therapeutic cannabinoids in the cannabis plant.

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Dr. Malik Burnett is a former surgeon and physician advocate. He also served as executive director of a medical marijuana nonprofit organization. Amanda Reiman, PhD, holds a doctorate in Social Welfare and teaches classes on drug policy at the University of California-Berkeley.

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Cannabis has been used for thousands of years. It has been in the U.S. pharmacopoeia since 1850. A medical textbook from the 1920’s lists medical uses for cannabis. A Mexican American grandfather on hospice in 1995, explained how cannabis had helped his arthritic joints decades before.

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When alcohol prohibition failed and was repealed in 1933, Harry J. Anslinger, head of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics from 1930 to 1962, created the word marihuana claiming it led to addiction, violence, overdosage. Anslinger used racist propaganda to instill fear in Americans that only Mexicans and Negros use cannabis which led to creation of the Marijuana Tax Act passed by congress in 1937. Not unlike the CDC Opioid Guideliness of March 2016, it was passed over the objections of the AMA.

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The American Medical Association (AMA) opposed the act because the tax was imposed on physicians prescribing cannabis, retail pharmacists selling cannabis, and medical cannabis cultivation/manufacturing. The AMA proposed that cannabis instead be added to the Harrison Narcotics Tax Act. The bill was passed over the last-minute objections of the American Medical Association. Dr. William Creighton Woodward, legislative counsel for the AMA objected to the bill on the grounds that the bill had been prepared in secret without giving proper time to prepare their opposition to the bill. He doubted their claims about marijuana addiction, violence, and overdosage; he further asserted that because the word Marijuana was largely unknown at the time, the medical profession did not realize they were losing cannabis. “Marijuana is not the correct term… Yet the burden of this bill is placed heavily on the doctors and pharmacists of this country.”

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Israel’s Professor Rafael Mechoulam is widely recognized for his work on cannabis over more than 40 years. He and his lab isolated and identified THC, CBD, cannabinoid receptors, endogenous cannabinoids – your brain makes two of them! Your body has more cannabinoid receptors than any other type. It was he who published 40 years ago that CBD controls certain types of epilepsy in children – and it was ignored until Dr. Sanjay Gupta publicized this in the last one or two years.

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Professor Mechoulam says CBD from the plant (the plant is illegal in the United States) outperforms synthetic CBD.

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However, standards for CBD products do not exist, assays may be unreliable, it may be extracted with harsh chemicals that are harmful to those who are ill, and FDA has warned against false claims of efficacy. 

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Nevertheless, there are indications CBD may help pain. It has no psychoactive properties. It does not cause intoxication. There is no THC in it.

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CBD, Cannabidiol, is one of the 86 known cannabinoids in the cannabis plant that has 400 chemicals. In addition, the plant has perhaps 100 or 200 unique terpenes, also said to help symptoms. 

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Topical CBD may help – keep that in mind when Blue Shield’s formulary offers only rectal suppository morphine (unless you wait days and hope they will approve a prior authorization).

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I received a note today about Colorado Hemp Farmers:

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a woman in her sixties suffering from sciatica who is having her nurse rub her back with a coconut oil extract of a specific strain of industrial hemp rich in CBD, but without significant THC. She reports that the pain alleviation is remarkable with the soothing extract, which she judged to be superior to when commercially available CBD oil was used. 

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Have any readers have tried CBD for pain?

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Your feedback would help to inform researchers to add an additional arm to the tests now being done in rats.

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I have heard from one man with severe pain today. He uses CBD in many forms. It helps pain a little, and also it is calming. He describes it like you know pain is better after you take ibuprofen. Similar with CBD. He does not feel at all drugged.

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This site is not for email.

If any questions, please schedule an appointment with my office.

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment

provided by a qualified health care provider.

Relevant comments are welcome.

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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Please be aware any advertising on this free educational website is

NOT advocated by me and NOT approved by me.

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