CDC gets list of forbidden words: “evidence-based” & “science-based.”


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The Washington Post just now published this headline, click on it to read the article:

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“CDC gets list of forbidden words: fetus, transgender, diversity”

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The forbidden words are “vulnerable,” “entitlement,” “diversity,” “transgender,” “fetus,” “evidence-based” and “science-based.”

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In some instances, the analysts were given alternative phrases. Instead of “science-based” or “evidence-based,” the suggested phrase is “CDC bases its recommendations on science in consideration with community standards and wishes,” the person said. In other cases, no replacement words were immediately offered…..

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….The ban is related to the budget and supporting materials that are to be given to the CDC’s partners and to Congress, the analyst said.

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It likely includes many agencies across government. If you cannot talk about it, it does not exist and therefore is not funded. 

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I am closing my practice on December 23rd, 2017, in just a few days. The world is not real. It is so easy to walk away from it now. There but for the grace of the gods….the insanity.

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

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It is not legal for me to provide medical advice without an examination.

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It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

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Comments are welcome.

This site is not for email, not for medical questions, and not for appointments.

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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Please IGNORE THE ADS BELOW. They are not from me.

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Companies out of the pain business, NOT a hotbed of innovation, NOT COVERED by insurers


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Bloomberg news published this analysis below that explains much of the dead end in pain medication:

  • companies got out of the pain business.
  • there is no hope in sight for effective analgesics
  • insurers refuse coverage for more and more pain medications
  • insurers refuse coverage for modalities except opioids

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What kind of medical system:

  • forces patients to seek street drugs for pain relief because they are cheaper?
  • fails to treat addicts?
  • fails to allow cannabis (medical marijuana) one of the safest drugs ever discovered for pain and symptom management?

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The whole field is a sham ruled by politicians through CDC fiat and the justice department, subject to radical changes:

  •  a threat to your care
  • a threat to the field of pain management
  • a brick wall to any professional contemplating entering the field
    • pain management is complex & time consuming
    • most chronic pain patients have 3 or more pains
    • each pain requires assessment
    • risks patient addiction and/or suicide
    • risks loss of license
  • constant change
    • prior authorizations from insurers refused on appeal
    • disability refused for disabling pain
    • onerous computerized opioid database that is not nationwide, not fully completed by pharmacists
    • threats from patients, addicts, DEA, attorney general
    • highly politicized
    • good specialists thrown in jail despite expert testimony of foremost pain specialists – after testimony of addicts who reduced their sentence with lies
    • poor coverage of modalities if any for P.T., acupuncture, massage, integrative pain management, psychology, biofeedback, psychiatry, cannabis, compounded medications
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Here’s the article, click title to read in full.
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For the drug industry, building a better pain pill is a problem.

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Pharmaceutical companies have introduced new medicines to treat dependence, reverse overdoses, and deal with opioids’ side effects. But few effective and economically viable alternatives to addictive painkillers have emerged from the laboratory.

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That’s because of broken incentives, according to economists and industry experts. The payment policies of insurers and government health programs, along with pressure from investors, have encouraged drugmakers to treat the symptoms of the opioid epidemic but discouraged innovations that might get to the root of the problem.

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New therapies for pain have generally been too expensive, too cumbersome to use, or targeted at too small a group of patients….

 

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Different Incentives

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The incentives to develop a better pain pill differ sharply from those in other areas of research, such as Alzheimer’s disease.

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Drugmakers have spent billions on more than 100 failed medicines for Alzheimer’s, but a breakthrough would potentially reach a large and lucrative population of elderly patients on Medicare. Any new pain drug would be fighting it out with inexpensive, proven rivals in a politically fraught environment.

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The White House Council of Economic Advisers estimated this week that abuse of opioids cost the economy about $504 billion in 2015, or nearly three percent of that year’s overall economic output in the U.S. Those costs include health-care expenses, spending on criminal justice and first responders, and lost worker productivity.

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“There’s currently a lot more costs of addiction that are being borne by society in a more diffuse way,” said Kosali Simon, a health economist at Indiana University….

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Effort and Expense

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Most opioids are cheap generic drugs that have been prescribed for decades, making the effort and expense of developing new painkillers hard to justify.

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“They’re off-patent, they can be produced by companies that aren’t the original inventors,” said Bertha Madras, a professor of psychobiology at Harvard Medical School and a member of President Donald Trump’s opioid commission. “It becomes a much more expensive proposition to develop and get the approval for an opioid.”

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Drugmakers have instead invested in developing complex medicines for cancer and rare diseases, which can fetch six-figure price tags.

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“Companies got out of the pain business,” said Pratap Khedkar of ZS Associates, a sales and marketing consultant who studies the pharmaceutical industry. “It’s not the hotbed of innovation.”…..

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Wary Payers

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Drug plans have been reluctant to pay for abuse-resistant pain medicines, which often cost more and can be more difficult to administer. A recent report from The Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, a nonprofit that evaluates the value of prescription drugs, found that abuse-deterrent opioids weren’t cost-effective for insurers.

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At the same time, payers are limiting patients’ access to older pain drugsCigna Corp.took OxyContin off its list of preferred drugs for 2018, though it still covers other opioids. CVS Health Corp. said its pharmacy-benefits management arm will limit prescriptions to a seven-day supply, and Express Scripts Holding Co. also said it wouldcurb prescriptions.

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That leaves patients with a difficult choice. Abuse-deterrent painkillers might cost as much as $250 out of pocket. But generic opioids cost as little as $2, according to Denis Patterson, a pain specialist in Reno, Nevada.

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Abuse-resistant drugs get “denied 90 percent of the time. But the pain pills will get approved every single time,” said Patterson.

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“Shouldn’t it be flipped,” he said, “in that the things which can get people better should have better coverage?”…..

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

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It is not legal for me to provide medical advice without an examination.

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It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

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Comments are welcome.

This site is not for email, not for medical questions, and not for appointments.

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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Please IGNORE THE ADS BELOW. They are not from me.

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Opioids: a think tank to expose the deep-rooted failures and injustices in our health care system


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STAT is “a new national publication focused on finding and telling compelling stories about health, medicine, and scientific discovery” in partnership with the Lown Institute.

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“The Lown Institute is a think tank dedicated to research and public communication to expose the deep-rooted failures and injustices in our health care system, and to helping clinicians, patients, and communities develop a shared vision for a better health system.”

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.“Since 2012, the Lown Institute has been a leading voice in the movement to recognize the harms of overuse of medical care, and in pointing out the clear connection between wasteful medical treatment and our system’s failure to deliver needed care.”

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This article from STAT, excerpted below, beautifully and painfully describes the opposing sides of the deep divide in our country about treatment with opioid analgesics for chronic pain. It is a divide deeper than the growing upheaval of politics in America, and it is unique to us. The United States, with 5% of the world’s population, consumes 80% of the global opioid supply, and an estimated 99% of hydrocodone. “Pain drugs are the second-largest pharmaceutical class globally, after cancer medicines.”

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I have seen both sides, those who cannot live or function without opioids and those whose pain improves radically once they taper off. The war on patients plays out many times daily, while patients and doctors alike are deeply concerned at the lack of research in this volatile unpredictable field, where patients are subjected to whack-a-dose prescriptions since the March 2016 CDC fiat that dictated slashed opioid dosages, a dictate that now entitles insurers to deny all medication overnight —saving them tremendous costs. All denied, no matter how small the dose, nor how intense the diagnoses and pain.

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This irrational, inhumane, and unpredictable disease of change has become a constant, destroying lives of patients and caregivers while addicts continue to overdose evermore and prisons are filled with low level street corner dealers —never the rich who buy their way out of prison. Cheating is a way of life for corporations, condoned by congress.

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A ‘civil war’ over painkillers rips apart the medical community — and leaves patients in fear

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PALO ALTO, Calif. — For Thomas P. Yacoe, the word is “terrifying.”

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Leah Hemberry describes it as “constant fear.”

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For Michael Tausig Jr., the terror is “beyond description.”

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All three are patients struggling with chronic pain, but what they are describing is not physical agony but a war inside the medical community that is threatening their access to painkillers — and, by extension, their work, their relationships, and their sanity.

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Two years after the United States saw a record 27,000 deaths involving prescription opioid medications and heroin, doctors and regulators are sharply restricting access to drugs like Oxycontin and Vicodin. But as the pendulum swings in the other direction, many patients who genuinely need drugs to manage their pain say they are being left behind.

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Doctors can’t agree on how to help them.

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There’s a civil war in the pain community [my emphasis],” said Dr. Daniel B. Carr, president of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. “One group believes the primary goal of pain treatment is curtailing opioid prescribing. The other group looks at the disability, the human suffering, the expense of chronic pain.”

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Pain specialists say there is little civil about this war.

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“There’s almost a McCarthyism on this, that’s silencing so many people who are simply scared,” said Dr. Sean Mackey, who oversees Stanford University’s pain management program.

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“The thing is, we all want black and white. We don’t do well with nuance. And this is an incredibly nuanced issue.”

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Stanford’s Mackey said those risks are important to recognize. But, he said, nearly 15,000 people die a year from anti-inflammatory medications like ibuprofen. “People aren’t talking about that,” he said….

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…Dr. Anna Lembke, who practices alongside Mackey at Stanford’s pain clinic and is chief of the Stanford Addiction Medicine Dual Diagnosis Clinic, published a book about the opioid crisis last year. It was titled: “Drug Dealer, MD: How Doctors Were Duped, Patients Got Hooked, and Why It’s So Hard to Stop.

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Lembke believes that long-term opioid use can cause patients to perceive pain even after the original cause of pain has cleared. Some patients, she said, find themselves free of pain only once they have endured the often agonizing effects of opioid withdrawal.

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“That’s what we’re seeing again and again,” she said.

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…. a single father of two teens, said that every month he needs to fill a prescription, he’s fearful it will be denied.

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Mackey says doctors being trained at Stanford’s pain center have grown increasingly fearful about prescribing opioids...

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[Dr. Mackey describes a practicing 81 year old physician who cycled to work until recent back surgery. His life is now complicated by severe back pain and he requires opioids to continue to function.]

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“If you’re 81 and you stop getting out of bed, it’s a slippery slope,” he said.

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.
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It is not legal for me to provide medical advice without an examination.

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It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

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This site is not for email and not for appointments.

If you wish an appointment, please telephone the office to schedule.

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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Please IGNORE THE ADS BELOW. They are not from me.

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Opioids: Will We Let Politicians Treat Pain? Need Presidential Debates on Precedent


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Pain kills

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Cutting back my patient’s opioids when they were helping, when there is no better alternative, none better –  it is the most painful thing I’ve ever been asked to do as a doctor. Withdraw necessary medicine. On orders from the federal government forcing me to harm my patient.

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Harm my patient. The thought sickens. Forced by government orders to harm my patient.

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Orders. Cold as a steel gun held by DEA Swat team bursting into my office if I don’t act on government orders. Certain dictatorships treat citizens that way.

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Congress is pushing this opioid bust very hard.

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That is demagoguery

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I am pained and suspicious in several ways.

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Legal nationwide precedent.

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A precedent in government, deciding for each individual person, without good faith history and examination of each, now orders each person’s medical treatment.

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It overrides judgement. I feel my judgement specializing for decades in pain management, with or without use of opioids, using comprehensive multi-specialty approaches has always chosen excellence in the field of pain management, in accord with State and Federal guidelines until this new one, and within the best practices of the American Pain Society.

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Best practices are irrelevant. Choke on that one. The lack of options is impossible to swallow. It is life-changing for the most severely disabled patients across the country.

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It has nothing to do with the subject: pain control.

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Nothing to do with helping to relieve pain.

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It causes grave harm to my patients and their families and sets an astonishing precedent among healthcare insurers to never allow more than the guidelines; the federal CDC-invented, arbitrary, pseudoscience, one-size-fits-all guideline for opioids because:

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the government can’t deal appropriately with the heroin epidemic and the war on drugs. They ignore results from countries that have done more enlightened research to point the way.

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Demogogues order doctors how to treat everyone. This country is has done what China and Russia have done to their citizens. I am in shock. My patients are in shock. Aghast. Feeling forced to bend over and swallow an undemocratic, unscientific piece of

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This used to be a free country with certain rational sets of behavior and one that recognized a need for pain specialists. Only recently did it create specialists in pain management. Specialists who get ignored. Does this happen in every other field? Shouldn’t we all care no matter our expertise because we may all have bad pain if we live long enough? Chronic noncancer pain. What if some federal agency starts ordering you that dialysis will be allowed less often?

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None of us gets away from the grip of the irreligious opioid guidelines. Will we have intractable pain at some time in our lives? Will we allow government to dictate that you or your spouse or gram cannot be given the dose that has safely helped for years? The guidelines were forced on us.

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Insurance will not pay for more.

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This needs to be discussed as a presidential election debate issue.

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Demagogues appear at times of unrest across the country. Politicians may feel forced to bow to the anti-opioid groups, angry because of the heroin epidemic and at how badly addiction treatment is neglected in this country.

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But for pain patients not addicts, to be subjected to directives from federal agencies, CDC and DEA, how do we object to this unscientific, irrational precedent? At least debate it on a presidential level.

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Drug abuse, addiction, pain management and healthcare insurance as it pertains to these new federal opioid guidelines presume to treat pain but force us all into a cage of irrational pseudoscientific dictates. And we are forced to mangle the finely adjusted treatment of your pain, your spouse or your granny’s pain. We’ve slogged through so much to get there. It’s tough to find the right balance with chronic daily pain.

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Those running for president:

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What is the candidate’s position on this unprecedented fiat that dictates your maximum morphine equivalent daily dose (MEDD) you can receive?  It is a dose that is far less than you’ve been on for years that had been helping.

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Is this creating unprecedented pain among 50 million Americans with chronic pain?

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Are we going to let politicians treat our patients with pain?

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This site is not email. Not intended for medical advice.

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This is the start of all sorts of federal dictates

into your medical care.

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Pseudoscience, Opioids, Politicians – Oh MY! Whose MEDD? Slashing Dose


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Opioid Guidelines are Pseudoscience

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They do not pretend to treat pain

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CDC Opioid Guidelines limit opioids to

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 90 mg morphine equivalent daily dose, MEDD

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Whose calculations will the DEA use against your doctor?

 

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Chronic pain is life altering. Opioid guidelines are life altering. The introduction of pseudoscience on a nationwide scale is life altering. Actually being the physician to reduce opioid doses to comply with arbitrary guidelines is life altering.

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The guidelines are intended to stop death and misuse from opioid overdose, not intended to relieve pain. About the same as taking drivers off the highway to stop highway deaths. We are just about back in the era of pain management before 1990.

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A nationwide mandate that affects the practice of thousands of doctors and the health and well being of 50 million people whom the authors have never examined, is life altering.

 

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We are all in shock. Guidelines don’t care about pain. CDC does not care. It’s all about death from overdose – tens of thousands of overdoses every year. Even when we calculate some magic pseudo-equivalent dose, just how are we to get from point A to point Z?  It is not discussed. This anonymous treatment limit is an insult to our patients, and fails the standard of practice of medicine in this country that requires a good faith history and examination of the whole person, just to begin. Then to design a treatment plan.

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For example, how do we calculate the morphine equivalent daily dose (MEDD) of oxycodone? That can be tricky. Opioids vary from person to person, drug to drug and the tables used to calculate and convert from one to another all differ. How simple is that? Wouldn’t we rather be talking about opioid splice variants, anything, but this calculated number is based on pseudoscience, as explained in this publication:

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The MEDD myth: the impact of pseudoscience on pain research and prescribing-guideline development

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This critical paper is published by the Journal of Pain Research, which is open access peer reviewed. Why is this important?

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Let’s look at a few points:

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In 2014, Shaw and Fudin conducted a survey comparing various online opioid dose-conversion tools and found a −55% to +242% variation across eight opioid-conversion calculators.16 The standard deviations in these two studies alone exceeded many of the MEDD maximums that several states have employed to trigger consultation from a certified pain expert.8,17–19 These studies alone unequivocally disqualify the validity of embracing MEDD to assess risk in any meaningful statistical way. Outside of MEDD calculations, there are several factors that also require consideration, but that remain largely ignored. These include patient-specific attributes, such as pharmacogenetics, organ dysfunction, overall pain control, drug tolerance, drug–drug interactions, drug–food interactions, patient age, and body surface area.15 The bottom line is that as the scientific concepts upon which prescribing guideline authors depend are flawed and invalid, so are the guidelines themselves. As a result, we posit that these guidelines are disingenuous and highly unethical.

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Opiate overdoses unfortunately can occur at any dose, and patients are at risk on even low-dose opioids.

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Death can occur at any dose. There is no “distinct risk threshold.”

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The guidelines are intended to stop tens of thousands of deaths from opioid overdose, they are not intended to improve pain. Just as chronic pain seizes the brain, the opioid guidelines stop rational thinking and all your reflexes.

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The morphine equivalent daily dose (MEDD) of 90 mg is the maximum dose on the guidelines and affect everyone no matter how different your pain, your age, or your dose needs to be from another person, and regardless of how opioids differ from one another. Pseudoscience creates a huge problem. This is not only not evidence-based. There is no evidence at all.

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I have recently referenced criticism of the opioid guidelines which I recommend for additional details.

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It’s not only opioid guidelines. Medicine is an art, not a science. Real people and medicines have real differences. The New York Times reviews a book about medicine by Abraham Nussbaum, MD, that says it well:

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“He notes that partisans of today’s much promoted evidence-based medicine must determinedly finesse the fact that medicine is riddled with flawed, incomplete evidence. The leaders of genomic revolution trumpet a future that keeps being postponed. Quality-control gurus abound, but their work often fails to yield actual quality.”

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Will the opioid guidelines bring a prohibition like the alcohol prohibition of 1928?

 

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This site is not for email.

If any questions, please schedule an appointment with my office.

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment

provided by a qualified health care provider.

Relevant comments are welcome.

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For My Home Page, click here: 

Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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NOT advocated by me and NOT approved by me.

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CDC Opioid Guidelines – The Criticism in today’s Practical Pain Management


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Criticism of the CDC Opioid Guidelines

from today’s Practical Pain Management

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This excellent journal is edited by the gifted, much loved, and opinionated Forrest Tennant, MD, who we like to count on for not holding back. I missed it in the brief look I did today – this is necessarily sober.

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Following criticism of the CDC Opioid guidelines, please read important information on suicide prevention, below, and how Vancouver has prevented deaths from opioid overdose. At Vancouver’s clean supervised drug injection centers: Over the last 13 years, millions of injections have occurred at Insite and there have been no deaths.

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Two things stand out, on this page of criticism of the CDC Opioid Guidelines. In particular:

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  1.  The heartfelt, pointed comment by Daniel Carr, MD, the President of the American Academy of Pain Medicine(AAPM)

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  2.  Organizations that have criticized the CDC Opioid Guidelines

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Directly quoting, below:

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However, some have not responded to the CDC’s guidelines with unconditional support. A number of criticisms have been expressed by organizations, like the American Medical Association (AMA), the American Academy of Pain Medicine(AAPM), and the American Academy of Pain Management, that question the validity and quality of the guideline’s featured recommendations.

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[Emphasis mine]

The criticisms surround the CDC guideline’s low-quality evidence base, which excludes all data from studies investigating opioid efficacy recorded from 3 months to 1 year duration. This is a concerning omission, according to Daniel B. Carr, MD, President of the AAPM, because the guidelines are intended for treating pain that lasts longer than 3 months. By contrast, associations like the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) do accept studies in this longer range.

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AAPM Response

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In a statement released by AAPM, the association said they cautiously support the efforts of the CDC to address the challenges that often accompany prescribing opioids for chronic non-cancer pain.

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“We know that doctors—primary care and pain medicine specialists—are integral in treating pain wisely and carefully monitoring for signs of substance abuse. Abuse and diversion of prescription opioids must be addressed,” said Dr. Carr, Professor of Public Health and Community Medicine at Tufts University. “Opioids are not the usual first choice for treating chronic non-cancer pain, but they are an important option—as part of a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach— that must remain available to physicians and appropriately selected patients.”

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Dr. Carr said that society needs to address both chronic pain and its treatment as public health challenges. This view is endorsed by the National Academy of Medicine and outlined in the draft National Pain Strategy from the NIH.

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[emphasis mine]

“Public health problems are typically complex; well-meaning, but narrowly targeted, interventions often provoke unanticipated consequences,” he said. “We share concerns voiced by patient and professional groups, and other Federal agencies, that the CDC guideline makes disproportionately strong recommendations based upon a narrowly selected portion of the available clinical evidence. It is incumbent upon us all to monitor the deployment of the guideline to ensure that it does not inadvertently encourage under-treatment, marginalization, and stigmatization of the many patients with chronic pain that are using opioids appropriately.

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The AMA’s response:

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“While we are largely supportive of the guidelines, we remain concerned about the evidence base informing some of the recommendations, conflicts with existing state laws and product labeling, and possible unintended consequences associated with implementation, which includes access and insurance coverage limitations for non-pharmacologic treatments, especially comprehensive care, and the potential effects of strict dosage and duration limits on patient care,” said Patrice A. Harris, MD, the AMA board chair-elect and chair of the AMA Task Force to Reduce Opioid Abuse.

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“We know this is a difficult issue that doesn’t have easy solutions and if these guidelines help reduce the deaths resulting from opioids, they will prove to be valuable. If they produce unintended consequences, we will need to mitigate them. They are not the final word. More needs to be done, and we plan to continue working at the state and federal level to engage policy makers to take steps that will help end this epidemic.”

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Very sobering issues and too many deaths from opioid overdose. Whether alone, in combination with alcohol or other sedatives and sleeping pills, the focus is on opioid dosages.

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The fear is what the DEA will do in response to the guidelines. The immediate reality is that insurance formularies have changed in strange and unpredictable ways the last few months. As always, we may need to adjust dosing as patients age or illnesses enter into an evolving lifetime of care. Be prepared to change the dose, alert to doses that may be too high for their current medical condition, and always alert to opioid misuse, addiction, misjudgement, and mental health. Be wise and do the right thing.

 

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Suicide prevention

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The New York Times published March 9, 2015 on Blocking the Paths to Suicide, rethinking prevention.

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Sometimes, depression isn’t even in the picture. In one study, 60 percent of college students who said they were thinking about ways to kill themselves tested negative for depression.

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“There are kids for whom it’s very difficult to predict suicide — there doesn’t seem to be that much that is wrong with them.

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 Suicide can be a very impulsive act, especially among the young, and therefore difficult to predict.

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About 90 percent of the people who try suicide and live ultimately never die by suicide. If the people who died had not had easy access to lethal means, researchers like Dr. Miller reason, most would still be alive.

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“People think of suicide in this linear way, as if you get more and more depressed and go on to create a more specific plan,” Ms. Barber said.

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Dr. Igor Galynker, the director of the Family Center for Bipolar Disorder at Mount Sinai Beth Israel, noted that in one study, 60 percent of patients who died by suicide after their discharge from an acute care psychiatric unit were judged to be at low risk.

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“The assessments are not good,” he said. So Dr. Galynker and his colleagues are developing a novel suicide assessment to predict imminent risk, based upon new findings about the acute suicidal state.

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In fact, suicide is often a convergence of factors leading to a sudden, tragic event. In one study of people who survived a suicide attempt, almost half reported that the whole process, from the first suicidal thought to the final act, took 10 minutes or less.

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Among those who thought about it a little longer (say, for about an hour), more than three-quarters acted within 10 minutes once the decision was made.

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. . . growing evidence of suicide’s unpredictability, coupled with studies showing that means restriction can work, may leave public health officials little choice if they wish to reduce suicide rates.

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Ken Baldwin, who jumped from the Golden Gate Bridge and lived, told reporters that he knew as soon as he had jumped that he had made a terrible mistake. He wanted to live. Mr. Baldwin was lucky.

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Ms. Barber tells another story: On a friend’s very first day as an emergency room physician, a patient was wheeled in, a young man who had shot himself in a suicide attempt. “He was begging the doctors to save him,” she said. But they could not.

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Addiction

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Let us never forget the curse of addiction, and the profound misunderstanding our leaders make: it is a medical condition, not a choice. The war on drugs must be transformed from militarization of addiction to medicalization of addiction. Like Canada, Portugal and some of the South American countries.

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The New York Times writes this week of Vancouver’s clean supervised drug injection centers. Over the last 13 years, millions of injections have occurred at Insite and there have been no deaths.

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opioid and heroin overdose deaths are preventable. The drug Naloxone, which blocks the effects of heroin, is a safe, inexpensive antidote when someone is available to administer it, as is the case at Insite.

 

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Coda

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After all this, it feels like we’ve advanced a long way into the 21st century. Old stuff does not work. There sure is a whole bunch of stuff that no longer works. Life happened, and moved along.

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This site is not for email.

If any questions, please schedule an appointment with my office.

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment

provided by a qualified health care provider.

Relevant comments are welcome.

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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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NIH Releases a National Pain Strategy


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Today NIH Releases a National Pain Strategy

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Doesn’t look too different from the opioid reduction strategy.

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From an excellent NYT article that covers several sides of the issues, and that I had previously linked two days ago:

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But alternatives are unrealistic for some. Physical therapy is too expensive for Ms. Kubicka-Welander: she can scarcely make the rent on her home in a trailer court. Patients with a compromised liver cannot take high doses of acetaminophen. Those on blood-thinners should not use ibuprofen.

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I would add that the American Pain Society cautions against use of ibuprofen and similar NSAIDS in seniors. The risk of taking these drugs – GI bleed, heart attacks and arrhythmias  – increases with age.

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