Ketamine Consensus Statement for Mood Disorders Needed


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I just had a call from a student writing a paper on ketamine. Question #1: What % respond to ketamine.

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Why are we still asking this rather than treating with ketamine?

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3.7% of Americans are disabled with Major Depression, many for decades, or entire lives. Antidepressants may work on only 30%. It’s time we had a consensus statement on use and training of ketamine.

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Read Cornel West: Pity the sad legacy of Obama, before you read on.

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Pity the sad legacy of psychiatry. Even neoliberals fail to speak up, stuck in the dictates of the few. We’ve known for decades that ketamine is effective treatment. It can work in hours. IV ketamine clinics are popping up like Jack in the Boxes and will continue to increase in number.

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It is time to ask: Is IV the only way to administer? Is it cost effective? Do these doctors have the right training?

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We need a consensus statement from psychiatrists and from the American Academy of Psychiatry and Neurology on training in inflammation, the innate immune system and treatment with ketamine.

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Every psychiatrist and mental health specialist should be instructed in rationale, the innate immune system, glia, inflammation, addiction medicine, glial modulators (ketamine is only one), and how to look at the whole system, holistically, not just one more drug. Inflammation, diet, exercise, among these.

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A focus on Ketamine alone in treating a complex organ like the brain is incomplete. Think inflammation, brain, spinal cord, glial modulators, not just drugs, not just ketamine. Ketamine is potentially addicting, a schedule III drug. Evaluate a patient just as you do when prescribing opioids.

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Then we need consensus on its use for intractable chronic pain including RSD/CRPS.

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Why don’t schools teach anything on the human body and the immune systems rather than biology and cutting up frogs?

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 Data below is from National Institute of Mental Health:

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Major Depression Among Adults.

  • Major depression is one of the most common mental disorders in the United States.

  • The 12-month prevalence data for major depressive episode presented here are from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health  (NSDUH). Based mainly on the 4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), in the NSDUH study a major depressive episode is defined as:

    • A period of two weeks or longer during which there is either depressed mood or loss of interest or pleasure, and at least four other symptoms that reflect a change in functioning, such as problems with sleep, eating, energy, concentration, and self-image.

    • Unlike the definition in the DSM-IV, no exclusions were made for a major depressive episode caused by medical illness, bereavement, or substance use disorders.

  • In 2015, an estimated 16.1 million adults aged 18 or older in the United States had at least one major depressive episode in the past year. This number represented 6.7% of all U.S. adults.

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