Medical Marijuana Proven to Save Lives, Science Issue on Pain, November 4, 2016


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The entire issue is devoted to Pain 

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From “Pot and Pain” page 566:

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Analyzing Medicare drug prescription data from 2010 to 2015 in states where medical marijuana is legal, David and Ashley Bradford at University of Georgia in Athens found significant differences in prescription of medications for anxiety and nausea. “But one condition stood out from the rest: ‘The effect for pain was 3 to 4 times larger than all of the others.'”

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“In medical marijuana states, each physician prescribed 1826 fewer doses of conventional pain medicines each year.” The reduction in pain prescriptions is even more dramatic in the younger Medicare Group.  [presumably disabled by pain]

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Marcus Buchhuber, previously at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Philadelphia, examined death certificates in all 50 states between 1999 and 2010. In states that permitted marijuana, there were nearly 25% fewer deaths from opioid drug overdose.

In 2010 alone, “that translated into 1729 fewer deaths” from overdose. And the effects grew stronger in the 5 to 6 years after medical marijuana was approved.

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Further information on Marijuana here.

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.
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It is not legal for me to provide medical advice without an examination.

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It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

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This site is not for email and not for appointments.

If you wish an appointment, please telephone the office to schedule.

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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Please ignore the ads below. They are not from me.

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Medication Summary for Intractable Pain, CRPS/RSD


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  Medication Summary for

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Intractable Pain, CRPS/RSD

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I spoke only briefly this morning at the RSDSA conference but there is so much to add. Most importantly, thanks to RSDSA for helping so many people with CRPS. They fund pain research, they are starting a free children’s camp, and now offer physicians one hour free CME teaching about CRPS.

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Holistic view, 36 points – that’s how I view caring for brain and nerves, very similar to the details used by UCLA Alzheimers Research Unit. In June 2015, I posted on their work on memory loss, dementia. We know chronic pain means inflammation in the brain, excess of proinflammatory cytokines. CT scans show memory loss and brain atrophy in those with chronic low back pain.  Can this inflammation lead to Alzheimers? Even if it doesn’t, why not maximize what we know we can do to help brain. As I view it, simply be meticulously detailed in giving the central nervous system (CNS) the best chance to relieve or prevent pain or disease.

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Below is a brief list.

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To find detail and sometimes depth, check the alphabetical lists on either side column until you see the category or tag when I first posted on that. Or simply plow through 7.5 years of detail with references. You do the work to check the side columns as I have no time to embed links below, taken from throughout this site.

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For now just a list of medication players that may be strikingly important in trying to bring intractable pain into remission even after 20 years. Yes, even chronic for decades.

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The list applies to intractable pain of all causes. I omitted listing standard interdisciplinary approaches commonly used by every pain specialist around the world. My patients have failed all those.

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Some patients with CRPS combine my medications with ketamine infusions.

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For those who remain on opioids, ultra low dose naltrexone (10 to 60 mcg three times daily) can significantly reduce pain, reduce opioid induced hyperalgesia, reduce windup, and thus reduce the dose of opioid needed to give improved relief.

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Opioids cause pain and trigger pro-inflammatory cytokines that create more pain.

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I strongly recommend slowly, gently tapering off opioid, and remaining off for 3 weeks before the following is trialed:

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 1. Vitamin D is anti-inflammatory. Important. Helps pain, depression. If bone loss is an issue, you will not absorb calcium from food if D is low. Mayo Clinic’s publication in 2012 showed more morphine is needed for pain if D is low. Huge literature of its benefit for depression. First topic I posted on – it is that important.

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2. Vitamin B6 can cause burning pain from scalp to toe, a toxic neuropathy. It can be toxic to brain. It is loaded in tons of soft drinks, “energy” drinks, supplements.

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3. MTHFR mutation may be present. Body cannot process  the B12 and folic acid you are eating or taking in supplement. A simple blood test, costly. Treatment is as simple as buying methyl folate and methyl B12 – no prescription needed. Folic acid in particular is profoundly important for one of the major energy cycles in the body. Can cause multiple conditions, some fatal, all from one single cause.

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4. Minocycline 100 mg/day is the dose I use but higher doses could be given. It is used daily for decades for acne. I may prevent spread of CRPS if given before surgery, dental work, even minor procedures. I start 24 hrs before, and continue for days after full recovery from surgery.

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5. Testosterone  in either male or female is depleted by opioids, it may be depleted by stress. Low T is a risk for depression, weakness and osteoporosis.

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6. Naltrexone low dose (LDN) – profoundly important. A glial modulator. Lifelong use.

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7. Dextromethorphan – reduces hyperexcitable glutamate

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8. Oxytocin

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9. Memantine – double the Alzheimers dose for CRPS. Like ketamine, it blocks the NMDA receptor.

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10. Lamotrigine

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11. Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA, PeaPure) a glial modulator, also acts on mast cells. A food supplement. No Rx. Your body makes it. Plants make it. Capsules & cream

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12. Ketamine via nasal spray, under tongue combined with IV or not, works on glutamate-NMDA receptor. Not an essential drug. Where ketamine has stopped working, patients have become pain free after years of CRPS.

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13. Creams combinations, so many

most of my CRPS pts very much like   Mg++/guai  10% each.

You may or may not trial various combinations lido/keto/keta, etc. Numerous. DMSO 50%.

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14. Medical Marijuana (CBD, THC, terpenes) Marijuana saves lives. Entire issue of Science, November 4, 2016, devoted to pain.

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NAC and alpha lipoic acid are noted by research from the Netherlands.

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Appendicitis

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If it has not burst, treat it like the infection that it is. Surgery may never be needed. I posted details of publications early 2016 with a case report. That young man was being rolled into the OR, instead was discharged 100% better without surgery 2 days later.
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Medications target 3 main systems

as discussed at the conference

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The opioid receptor – opioids create pain. They trigger glia to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines. Opioid induced hyperalgesia may occur. Cannot be used with low dose naltrexone.

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The glutamate NMDA receptor – ketamine, memantine

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Glia, the innate immune system – glial modulators

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Before they see me, my patients have failed all prior therapies even ketamine coma. I view it like football. You have one guy running down the field with one ball. Do you want to win the game? You’ve dealt with this for years. Let’s not prolong it. Hit it with my main choice of meds all at once. Jump on it. What if you get 10% relief – will you even notice 10% after many years of severe pain? But if you get 10% from each of 5 meds, then you are talking 50% relief as a start. Address those 3 main pain systems – even without ketamine – and I have posted a case report after 20 years and 3 suicide attempts before seeing me, she has been pain free for about 4 years as I recall. A surgeon nicked her sciatic nerve when she was 27. Two years ago, pain free, running on her treadmill, she twisted her ankle. She has permanent foot drop from the sciatic nerve injury, but even spraining her ankle did not flare her CRPS. Twenty years of CRPS, pain free for about 4 years. And ultimately, years ago, she was tapered off all the drugs with one exception: LDN lifelong.

 

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Most importantly, I did not have time to relay a very special message from my patient in Brooklyn:

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.Surround yourself with friends and family who love you.

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.Never give up hope.

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She had her first 2 or 3 pain free days this week, as she slowly increases doses of medication. She’s not yet at maximal effect and even then there can be increases. Sending love and courage.

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MOVEMENT

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Watch this on the RSDSA video, afternoon speakers, the parents of young ones who had RSD discussed today all the toys and games they had to devise to slowly force yourself to move through the pain, every single day, several times a day, all day, begin to move the body as much as you can. Set goals and slowly, at a pace you set, do the work. Make progress. Go forward. Keep moving. Do whatever you can to keep moving.

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RSD support groups are essential and I am glad to see the RSDSA list of so many throughout the country.

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There is so much more. Indeed, at least 36 points discussed on June 2015.

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.
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It is not legal for me to provide medical advice without an examination.

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It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

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This site is not for email and not for appointments.

If you wish an appointment, please telephone the office to schedule.

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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Please ignore the ads below. They are not from me.

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Ketamine Survey for MD’s from RSDSA – Please Help


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Jim Broatch, Executive Director of RSDSA requests help from doctors giving IV Ketamine to treat CRPS. Please ask your doctor to do the survey. 

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 https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/ZPP9BXY

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And remember, if you shop Amazon, you can direct Amazon to contribute a portion to RSDS.org —- many thanks! 

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This site is educational, not for email.

Relevant comments are welcome.

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Advertising on this free website, below, is not endorsed or sanctioned by me.

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Complex Regional Pain Syndrome in Remission 6 years


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 Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

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Celebrating six years of complete remission

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Why ketamine should never be used alone

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I first posted her case here. 

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For years, pain below both knees was 8 to 9 on scale of 10, “like I had swallowed a fire burning.”

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She was unable to stand or walk for more than 4 years before seeing me. This week, I again saw this very healthy athletic RN who at almost 70 of age is very youthful, very energetic. She failed IV ketamine given first by Dr. Schwartzman daily for one week, then boosters for 8 months.

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After 8 months of ketamine, then no response at all. None. 

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That’s when I prescribed other glial modulators and rational polypharmacy that brought CRPS into remission. Then very very slowly tapered off all but one, leaving only low dose naltrexone (LDN) for the last 8 years. Zero pain. None. Hiking, working, fully active.

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When used in conditions with known neuro-inflammation, rats or human, LDN is a one of the most powerful, most effective glial modulators I have ever seen clinically in my patients in the last 15 years.

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Until proven otherwise clinically, LDN should be taken lifelong in those cases.

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This website is not for email.

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The advertising is not approved by me and

unrelated to anything on these pages.

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only, and

is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Medicine Costly, Where’s the Gain?


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It’s been seven years since starting this blog April 2009.

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To find information:

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  1. SEARCH – small rectangle, top left above my photo

  2. TAGS – size indicates frequency the topic was posted, bottom left narrow column

     

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Sorry there’s no time to make the site easier for you to find your way around.

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I hope you all have a good summer. Get some much needed rest.

 

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It has been a blessing to have this resource as a way to structure and teach myself the many research publications and ideas I come across in Pain Management, Neurology, Integrative Medicine, Neuroimmunology and, yes, maybe politics of medicine. I only wish I had had this tool decades ago so that I didn’t have to recreate the ones I’ve already reviewed and forgotten in the last 41 years, long before MRI scans and decades before computers in daily medicine. Now we all risk carpal tunnel from repetitive injury, which is why I need to stop posting for awhile.

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This great experience and months of effort has rewarded me, bringing me in touch with the RSD Organization, device manufacturers, editors, publishers, academics, CEO’s, scientists, physicians and patients from around the world. Thank you all!

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The politics of the world is spinning fast, harsh winds are blowing, prices of drugs are beyond belief, beyond beyond — $50,000 to $100,000 a year for new drugs. My own colleagues cannot afford $5,000 insurance deductible for visits and medication. If you are diagnosed with cancer, pray it is January before your $5,000 or $10,000 deductible comes up again at end of year. Medical care in this country is in a down spiral, affordable to the few.

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Until I see something exciting to write about, I’m over and out. What more is there to say?

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Give us some hope in research for pain and major depression. Something more we can use now, something covered by healthcare insurers who seem not to cover much of anything anymore.

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Many insurance companies have not updated reimbursement rates for some specialties for 10 or 20 years. The specialties that had the highest percentage of doctors who accept insurance are cardiology, oncology and orthopedic surgery.

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Only 55% of psychiatrists accept insurance. How sad is that? When people need Mental Health Care more than ever, what do they do but in desperation, some turn to drugs, self treating, while the $3 trillion dollar war on drugs has created and perpetuates the spiral of addiction and endless funding that only serves to enrich the military prison industrial complex.

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War does not work. Medical care works. Instead of war on drugs, war on addiction, we need medical care not war. Medical care for addiction, medical care to prevent pain, to prevent and support mental illness, to prevent addiction.

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While setting writing aside, I shall enjoy turning more of my attention to my patients. It is a privilege to work with so many fine people, striving to put disabling conditions into remission.

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If you find exciting news, please post news below.

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I wish you all a wonderful summer – get some time out!

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For those with CRPS RSD, note a new comment on this site, this past week, on Neridronic Acid.

It was posted in an unrelated section at bottom on my home page.

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 For my Home Page, click here: 

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Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

 

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This site is not for email or medical advice.

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It is not legal for me to give medical advice

unless you are my patient

which means I have done a medical history and examination.

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I generally accept only those

who have failed most or all known treatments,

and only those who I feel I can help.

 

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I interview each patient before accepting.

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Any advertising below is not recommended or condoned by me.

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CRPS – Appendicitis treated with antibiotics can avoid surgery


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For someone who has CRPS/RSD, any trauma including surgery can severely flare CRPS and/or cause it to spread.

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A young man in his mid 20’s was headed for surgery for acute appendicitis last night. He is resolving now, 24 hours later, with IV antibiotics as I suggested. He’s the first in his hospital, a major hospital in Los Angeles.

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Dad called me last night. Mom texted me reports of CT abdomen showing thickened wall of appendix, and all labs consistent with acute bacterial appendicitis: WBC’s elevated 15.1, elevated neutrophils consistent with bacteria rather than virus. Overnight, his generalized abdominal pain is now focal and much reduced, WBC’s are ~8, well within normal range including neutrophils, and he took a good walk in hospital. By day two, WBC count was 5, normal, no elevation in neutrophils indicating brisk response to antibiotics knocking out bacteria. He’ll go home on oral antibiotics probably tomorrow. I asked and was told he has chronic constipation which begs the question if it can trigger infection because of sluggish gut.

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Treatment & References

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1. If you have CRPS, then before any procedure small, large or dental, begin minocycline, a glial modulator. It was found in animal research many years ago to prevent flare or spread of CRPS.

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2. Antibiotics IV for the bowel.

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Below is a list of articles, most from the outstanding library of the Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Association. Their vast collection of publications is organized by subject. I strongly recommend donating to them.

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Minocycline inhibits microglia activation and alters spinal Endocannabinoids

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Minocycline Neuroprotective- Johns Hopkins 2010 Archives of Neurology

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CRPS prolonged remission obtained by treatment of intestinal bacterial overgrowth. A multicenter study from Washington University in St. Louis, Stanford, Brown University.

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Effectiveness of Patient Choice in Nonoperative vs Surgical Management of Pediatric Uncomplicated Acute Appendicitis. One year prospective study from Nationwide Children’s Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, JAMA December 2016. IV Antibiotics for at least one day followed by 10 days of oral antibiotics.

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“Conclusions and Relevance  When chosen by the family, nonoperative management is an effective treatment strategy for children with uncomplicated acute appendicitis, incurring less morbidity and lower costs than surgery.”

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Antibiotics alone can be a safe, effective treatment for children with appendicitis. An article from Science Daily about the Nationwide Children’s Hospital study.

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“Families who choose to treat their child’s appendicitis with antibiotics, even those who ended up with an appendectomy because the antibiotics didn’t work, have expressed that for them it was worth it to try antibiotics to avoid surgery,” said Peter C. Minneci, MD, one of the authors.

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The appendix may be an important reservoir of bacteria to populate the gut with good bugs, our healthy microbiome.

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Why don’t we see appendicitis more often in adults?

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Surgery has very real potential dangers that may include infection, abscess, pulmonary emboli, cardiac arrythmias, brain damage from loss of oxygen, death. Years later, there may be chronic abdominal pain from scarring, adhesions of bowel, leading to more surgery to lyse the adhesions. Or acute pain from infarcted bowel when needed oxygen gets choked by adhesions that cause necrosis of segments of bowel, intense pain or perforation, possible death.

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Specific to laparoscopic surgery, I have seen two patients who developed years of intractable abdominal pain from the scope itself and in 2015 there was a recall of scopes across the country that caused death and/or antibiotic resistant infections carried on segments of the scope that could not be sterilized. Another concern, during laparoscopic surgery, they blow up the abdomen under very high pressures to float the organs away from the scope. Very high pressure.

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 Constipation

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Let’s see a study to determine how often chronic constipation is present for years potentially causing the appendix to become inflamed. This young man will be taking a stool softener such as DSS or Colace (same thing), and if that doesn’t work then a prescription for Amitiza is something to consider.

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There are 70,000 surgeries for appendicitis each year in children, usually teens, more often in males. In many cases the appendage is normal and surgery unnecessary.

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Antibiotics for uncomplicated appendicitis could save lives, prevent acute and long term complications, and lower healthcare costs.

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Immune cells make appendix ‘silent hero’ of digestive health

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November 30, 2015. . .Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are crucial for protecting against bacterial infection in people with compromised immune systems, report investigators. Their work shows that a network of immune cells helps the appendix to play a pivotal role in maintaining health of the digestive system, supporting the theory that the appendix isn’t redundant.
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The research team, a collaborative partnership between the groups of Professor Gabrielle Belz of Melbourne’s Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, and Professor Eric Vivier at the Centre d’Immunologie de Marseille-Luminy, France, found that innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are crucial for protecting against bacterial infection in people with compromised immune systems.

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By preventing significant damage and inflammation of the appendix during a bacterial attack, ILCs safeguard the organ and help it to perform an important function in the body, as a natural reservoir for ‘good’ bacteria. The research is published in today’s issue of Nature Immunology.

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Professor Gabrielle Belz, a laboratory head in the institute’s Molecular Immunology division, said the study’s findings show that the appendix deserves more credit than it has historically been given.

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“Popular belief tells us the appendix is a liability,” she said. “Its removal is one of the most common surgical procedures in Australia, with more than 70,000 operations each year. However, we may wish to rethink whether the appendix is so irrelevant for our health.

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“We’ve found that ILCs may help the appendix to potentially reseed ‘good’ bacteria within the microbiome — or community of bacteria — in the body. A balanced microbiome is essential for recovery from bacterial threats to gut health, such as food poisoning.”

Professor Belz said having a healthy appendix might even save people from having to stomach more extreme options for repopulating — or ‘balancing out’ — their microbiomes.

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“In certain cases, people require reseeding of their intestines with healthy bacteria by faecal transplant — a process where intestinal bacteria is transplanted to a sick person from a healthy individual,” Professor Belz said. “Our research suggests ILCs may be able to play this important part in maintaining the integrity of the appendix.

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“We found ILCs are part of a multi-layered protective armoury of immune cells that exist in healthy individuals. So even when one layer is depleted, the body has ‘back ups’ that can fight the infection.

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“In people who have compromised immune systems — such as people undergoing cancer treatment — these cells are vital for fighting bacterial infections in the gastrointestinal system. This is particularly important because ILCs are able to survive in the gut even during these treatments, which typically wipe out other immune cells.”

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Professor Belz has previously shown that diet, such as the proteins in leafy green vegetables, could help produce ILCs. “ILCs are also known to play a role in allergic diseases, such as asthma; inflammatory bowel disease; and psoriasis,” she said. “So it is vital that we better understand their role in the intestine and how we might manipulate this population to treat disease, or promote better health.”

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This site is not for email.

If any questions, please schedule an appointment with my office.

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment

provided by a qualified health care provider.

Relevant comments are welcome.

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For My Home Page, click here: 

Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Norway Prioritizes Healthcare for Pain – A Note on Cosmetic Breast Surgery


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Hello Norway! I need an emoji to smile welcome!

Population 5 million – therefore data on pain can be obtained

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534 readers on these pages from Norway in the four years since 2012 got me curious.

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Norway Institute of Public Health is charged to prioritize healthcare for pain.

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Impressive! Very smart.

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“Chronic pain affects about 30 per cent of the adult Norwegian population.”

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In Denmark, “chronic pain patients had four to five times 

more in-patient days in hospital than the general population.”

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Cosmetic breast implants one in five have nerve pain for life.

Implants must be replaced every 10 to 15 years.

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Surprise note from Irish physician on Norway- see below.

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Pain is the most common reason people see a physician. Pain is the most common cause of long term sick leave and disability in Norway, and likely in every first world country. Without doubt every investment in returning people to productive health relieves the burden on the entire country.

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The most common method of treatment is analgesic drugs, and, I would add, the most cost effective.

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Pain is more common in females than males. Cosmetic breast surgery is the most common gift to girls for high school graduation in America. It was of interest to find Norway’s statistics on that:

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In a Norwegian study of young, healthy women who had cosmetic breast surgery, 13 per cent reported spontaneous pain and 20 per cent reported pain when touched one year after surgery (23).” Ahhhh, but implants are a lifetime commitment and depending on style, must be replaced every 10 to 15 years.  Is pain compounded with each overlapping surgery? Scarring? Use of arms? What further issues arise once these women require breast cancer treatment? We know that after breast cancer treatment, chronic neuropathic pain affects between 20% and 50% of women. Obesity has been linked to chronic neuropathic pain developing after breast cancer surgery.


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. 13 per cent had pain after surgery

20 per cent one year later

7 per cent more than they did immediately following surgery –

Is risk compounded when replaced every 10 to 15 years for the next 70 years?

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One in five, 20 per cent with chronic lifelong nerve pain!

Insanity

How can they know? Show them prior to surgery.

 Informed consent: view a video interview of girls who developed nerve pain.

Can it be prevented? Or treat early?

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This is neuropathic pain, the hardest to treat. Miserable.

Light touch elicits intense pain.

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We all routinely underestimate risk of surgery. For true informed consent, it would be essential to show a video interview of girls with postoperative neuropathic pain, explaining the financial cost of chronic neuropathic pain the rest of their lives, how it affects use of the arms and ability to work, how many times they must see an MD every year for pills, how it may get worse over time, what type of pills are required – this educates the surgeons too on how to diagnose and treat nerve pain with sequellae of depression, anxiety, insomnia, and how it affects everyone in their family. Everyone suffers. Many are disabled and agitated by this intense nerve pain.

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How does stress and fear affect risk of cancer and other serious medical diseases?

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We know with rodents, from John Liebeskind’s research with an Israeli team at UCLA in the mid 70’s, pain profoundly increases spread of cancer resulting in quicker death from metastases. Pain kills. He lectured nationwide on this. I posted on his message just weeks ago, December 27. “Pain kills. A malefic force.”  “…pain can accelerate the growth of tumors and increase mortality after tumor challenge.”

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John C. Liebeskind, 1935 – 1997, distinguished scholar and researcher, past president of the American Pain Society, had the radical idea that pain can affect your health.

 

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Twenty percent! Girls don’t know. How could they?

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Does cosmetic breast enlargement at such young age

increase

potential risk of  tumorigenesis, invasiveness, metastasis?

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Trauma (surgery) activates microglia lifelong. Glia never return to baseline.

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Microglia produce inflammatory cytokines –  inflammation.

Inflammation underlies almost all known disease.

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Does breast surgery, any surgery, increase risk of other known disease?

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What does inflammation do to endometriosis and autoimmune risks in this population?

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These are purely speculative thoughts. We cannot know until it is studied longitudinally and prospectively – if ever. Large breasts are very trendy. Obesity is very common; alas it is also pro-inflammatory.

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Postsurgical sequaellae can be extremely challenging. I will try to post two case reports in the near future. They are complex, enlightening, tangled, difficult to diagnose, post-surgical cases. The senior chief of surgery at Mayo Clinic had only seen two prior cases like it in this man who had laparoscopic prostate surgery many years before. Surgical sequaellae cannot be predicted. Large scale surgery in girls for cosmetic reasons have unexpected consequences. What is their cost decades from now?

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Norway Institute of Public Health has very nice data on drugs used, graphed vs time for men and women.  

 

Chronic pain in children and adolescents

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The incidence of chronic pain in children and adolescents is poorly mapped in Norway, but the consumption of analgesics and figures from other countries suggest that chronic pain is also common in adolescence (8). In the Health Interview Survey of 2005, parents reported that 6 per cent of children aged 6-10 years and 12 per cent of adolescents aged 11-15 years had chronic pain symptoms.

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A study of 12-15 year olds in South and North Trøndelag shows that 17 per cent suffered regularly from headaches, abdominal pain, back pain or pain in arms / legs (9). Consumption of analgesic drugs among Norwegian 15-16 year olds is high and has risen considerably since 2001 (10).

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Treatment

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Pain is probably the most common reason for patients to seek health care (26). A Swedish study found that 28 per cent of patients in general practice had one or more medically-defined pain conditions (27) – (my patients have at least 3 or 4). Corresponding figures are found in Denmark (28), where it has also been shown that chronic pain patients had four to five times more in-patient days in hospital than the general population (29). Corresponding figures for Norwegian conditions are unavailable.

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Irish physician comments on Norway

just minutes before writing about Norway! sweet coincidence. He posted on a case report I wrote in 2010 on Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) and low dose naltrexone, (LDN).

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Dr Edmond O`Flaherty

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I am a primary care physician in Ireland. I have been prescribing LDN for 9 years and it has utterly changed the lives of hundreds of people. The main conditions I see are fibromyalgia, chronic pain, MS, various cancers, Crohns/UC, chronic fatigue/ME, several other auto-immune diseases and one case of Interstitial Cystitis where a 30-year woman had “a fire in her bladder 24 hours a day” and who was due to have a cystectomy (bladder replaced by a plastic bag!) a month later than when she came to me by chance and soon became well.

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TV2 in Norway made a film about LDN in 2013 which was seen by 10 % of the population. The number using it there went from 300 to 15,000 in a few months. It is now on the website of http://www.lowdosenaltrexone.org in America and I was the only doctor outside Norway who was involved. I agreed to partake if they subtitled it in English which they did.

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.Yes

Yes. Opioids cause pain. Naltexone relieves, and often resolves pain.

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My comment:

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Based on the work posted on these pages, RSDS.org sent scientists and specialists to my office in 2010. Over two days I introduced them to eight of my patients with years of intractable chronic pain, all of whom responded to low dose naltrexone, four of whom required treatment only one month with sustained pain relief   for years! RSDS is now funding a study on LDN for CRPS at Stanford.

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Norway has well known large cities, UNESCO heritage sites and this absolutely gorgeous small seaport village Reine on an island in the Lofoten archipelago, above the Arctic Circle. It was “selected as the most beautiful village in Norway by the largest weekly magazine in Norway (Allers) in the late 1970’s” and is visited by many thousands annually. “Lofoten is known for a distinctive scenery with dramatic mountains and peaks, open sea and sheltered bays, beaches and untouched lands. Though lying within the Arctic Circle, the archipelago experiences one of the world’s largest elevated temperature anomalies relative to its high latitude. Lowest temperature ranges from 28.4 to 35.6 degrees F.  The warmest recording in Svolvær is 30.4 °C (87 °F).

 

 

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Sequoia wildflower

 

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

It is not a substitute for medical advice,

diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

Relevant comments are welcome.

If any questions, please call the office to schedule an appointment.

This site is not email for personal questions.

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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Please be aware any advertising on this free website is

NOT advocated by me and NOT approved by me.

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