Pain Patients to Congress: CDC’s Opioid Guideline Is Hurting Us, 2% NIH budget for Pain


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Pain Patients to Congress: CDC’s Opioid Guidelines is Hurting Us. Has stoked “climate of fear” leading to inadequate treatment of chronic pain

CLIMATE OF FEAR

WASHINGTON — Patients with chronic pain are suffering from ham-handed efforts to curb opioid overdoses, a series of witnesses told the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee on Tuesday.

  • by Shannon Firth, Washington Correspondent, MedPage Today February 13, 2019 

In particular, the CDC’s 2016 guidelines for opioid prescribing came under heavy fire, as even a self-described supporter of its recommendations admitted the evidence base was weak.

In 2018, Congress passed the SUPPORT for Patients and Communities Act, which included billions of dollars in funding aimed at curbing the overdose epidemic and expanding access to treatment for those with substance use disorders.

About 50 million Americans suffer from chronic pain and almost 20 million have high-impact chronic pain. At the same time, more than 70,000 people died from drug overdoses in 2018, often involving opioids, said HELP Committee Chairman Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) at the start of Monday’s hearing.

Even as Congress tries to dramatically curb the supply and the use of opioids, “we want to make sure … that we keep in mind those people who are hurting,” said Alexander.

Cindy Steinberg, national director of policy and advocacy for the U.S. Pain Foundation, argued that well-intentioned efforts to address the epidemic — particularly strategies to tamp down overprescribing — have stoked a “climate of fear” among doctors.

Thousands of patients with chronic pain have been forcibly tapered off their medications or dropped from care by their physicians, said Steinberg. (Physicians in California, under threat of medical-board sanction if patients die from overdoses, have reported similar reactions.)

Such decisions are “inhumane and morally reprehensible,” she said.

Steinberg, herself a pain patient, said she takes opioids in order to function. Eighteen years ago, Steinberg was injured when a set of cabinets fell on her. Since her accident, she experiences constant pain, she said, and throughout the hearing she took breaks from testifying to recline on a cot and pillow.

She was especially critical of the CDC’s opioid guidelines, which included recommendations regarding the number of days and dosage limits for certain pain patients.

“When opioids are used for acute pain, clinicians should prescribe the lowest effective dose of immediate-release opioids and should prescribe no greater quantity than needed for the expected duration of pain severe enough to require opioids. Three days or less will often be sufficient; more than seven days will rarely be needed,” notes a CDC fact sheet.

These recommendations have been “taken as law,” she said.

In 2016, Massachusetts set a 7-day limit on first-time opioid prescriptions, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures, which counted 33 states with laws limiting opioid scripts as of October 2018.

Steinberg said the guidelines should be rewritten.

Because of the CDC’s reputation, “people think that those [guidelines] are based on strong science and they’re not,” Steinberg said. Pain consultants were not involved in the development of the guidelines, she said.

(Voicing similar concerns in November, the American Medical Association passed a resolution opposing blanket limits on the amount and dosage of opioids that physicians can prescribe.)

Steinberg pointed instead to the Pain Management Best Practices Inter-Agency Task Force, a group appointed by Congress of which she is a member, which issued its own draft recommendations in December.

Alternatively, the NIH (which she noted has an office dedicated to pain policy) could be asked to make recommendations, she suggested.

Halena Gazelka, MD, chair of the Mayo Clinic Opioid Stewardship Program in Rochester, Minnesota, pointed out that the guidelines were “intended to advise primary care providers” and not to provide “hard and fast rules.”

“I actually like the CDC guidelines,” Gazelka said. Mayo’s own guidelines are based on the CDC’s. However, “the doses that are mentioned, probably are not scientifically-based, as we would prefer that they would be,” she acknowledged.

Another challenge for some pain patients are situations that pit prescribers against pharmacists, said Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska).

“It’s the pharmacists that are refusing to fill the prescription the doctor has prescribed,” she said, blaming the CDC guidance. Pharmacists are following it out of “an abundance of caution,” including in cases where abuse is not suspected, she suggested.

Steinberg said, “I think we need public education about pain and the fact that pain is a disease itself. … Pharmacists are not getting proper training in that, I don’t think anyone is getting proper training in pain.” She asserted that veterinarians get nearly 10 times as many hours of pain management training as do medical students.

Andrew Coop, PhD, of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy in Baltimore, returned to the CDC guideline. “I think those guidances on the quotas, I think they’ve been taken too far and that needs to be rolled back.”

Improving Care

In exploring other ways to improve care for patients with chronic pain, Gazelka recalled the pain clinics that existed 30 years ago, which included a physician, a psychologist, and a physical therapist.

“It would be ideal to return to a situation where people could have all of that care in one place,” Gazelka told MedPage Today after the hearing. But most small practices and even institutions may not have the same blend of clinicians, and the cost could be “prohibitive,” she said.

Access to specialists also poses a problem, noted witnesses as well as senators.

In her own pain group, it takes patients more than a year to get an appointment with pain specialists, Steinberg said. She encouraged Congress to “incentivize” pain management as a specialty.

Gazelka agreed and suggested leveraging telemedicine and electronic health records to extend the reach of existing specialists.

Telemedicine can allow primary care physicians to consult with pain management specialists, she said. Also, in Mayo’s own controlled substances advisory group, she and other specialists review cases submitted by primary care clinicians and provide advice directly into the patient’s medical record. However, Gazelka noted that privacy protections in some states might disallow that.

Gazelka noted that insurance coverage can be a barrier to non-opioid alternatives. For example, the Mayo Clinic has a Pain Rehabilitation Center staffed by specialists in pain medicine, physical therapy, occupational therapy, biofeedback, and nursing that aims to treat pain without opioids. But Medicaid won’t pay for it, she testified.

Witnesses also spoke of efforts to develop non-addictive painkillers, such as NIH’s Helping to End Addiction Long-term program.

Steinberg called these efforts “a great start” but noted that only 2% of the NIH’s budget is directed towards pain research. Funding should be “commensurate with the burden of pain,” she said.

Finally, Coop pressed the committee to take seriously the potential of medical marijuana.

Acknowledging that it’s a controversial area, he stressed the need for “good consistent, well-designed clinical studies with good consistent material,” referring to the type of marijuana used.

But speaking to reporters after the hearing, Alexander was cautious. “I’ve supported giving states the right to make decisions about medical marijuana. That’s about as far as I’m willing to go right now.”

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.
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It is not legal for me to provide medical advice without an examination.

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It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Families Refusing Opioids for Pain in Dying Loved Ones


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Refusal of care in the palliative care setting, lack of cooperation in treating pain. Fear the pain medicine will kill. Addicts dying of overdoses. Fear the dying grandmother will be addicted or die from the pain medicine. Fear of addiction in the family, unsafe to keep opioid for the patient. So many fears, myths and misunderstandings.

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Fear has taken over in so many levels of our consciousness. That is why we all need to educate ourselves so that we are prepared to safely help those we love when the time arises.

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Death and dying need not mean agonizing pain. Strong pain may require strong opioids for relief, and strong opioids can be safely adjusted to allow good mental function so you and your loved ones can be present in the last days. Not, not in shock and anguish from screaming pain going on for weeks.

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Yes, I have been called to help a family whose mother was in her last days, on palliative care. Her only communication for weeks was loudly moaning with grimacing and wincing the muscles of her face. They were refusing to give even the tiniest drops of morphine under her tongue, as recommended weeks ago by the palliative care physician.

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Refusal of care will only get worse, not just for the dying but millions with chronic pain. Physicians refusing to treat pain or being firmly uncooperative with family or pain team recommendations. This is a huge issue in cancer hospitals and cancer wards. The old way was never to give opioids for cancer. The standards in medicine are set by the old guys who pass it on and control all coming up the ranks. Don’t step out of line. Fear is in control.

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Dispel that fear. Inform yourself in proper care recommendations by leaders in the field or you will live with regret when your loved ones died screaming in pain and you refused care. I have seen many oncologists refuse pain care and threaten patients, families and staff.

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Read some of the myths and issues that are too frequently encountered by caregivers all across the country – click here.

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

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It is not legal for me to provide medical advice without an examination.

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It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

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Comments are welcome.

This site is not for email, not for medical questions, and not for appointments.

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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Please IGNORE THE ADS BELOW. They are not from me.

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Medicare & Insurers Crack Down on Opioids – Patients Suffer


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Individualized pain management does not exist.

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Correction from reader: 

“Individualized treatment does exist, but insurance companies are not paying for it. This has to change.” 

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The New York Times reports “Medicare is Cracking Down on Opioids” (link below).

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Last year an insurer denied 10 mg daily Oxycontin for one of my seniors who had been safely taking this for many years. That is less than 1 mg per hour for 12 hour relief. Pharmacy refused to fill unless insurer approved. That’s one way to reduce healthcare costs without an uprising. There is little tolerance for someone with pain. Are they viewing patients as addicts? Would they do this for cancer? 

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

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It is not legal for me to provide medical advice without an examination.

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It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

~~

Comments are welcome.

This site is not for email, not for medical questions, and not for appointments.

~~~~~

For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Please IGNORE THE ADS BELOW. They are not from me.

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Anger


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Anger at the failure of our medical system to support research and treatment of pain, anger at failure of the few currently available analgesics, anger at lack of interest or funding from Pharma – it requires at least $10,000,000 more to finish one important human treatment before submitting to FDA – that’s just one study. Pharma does not care, the price is peanuts to them. At one point, a company bought it, intending only to bury it. They do that for rheumatology treatments too, both the innate immune system and the adaptive immune system are being ignored. What could be more powerful than the immune system?

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Anger

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Anger at the failure of most medical organizations to discuss cannabis, medical marijuana. Training in cannabis is imperative.

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I am thrilled that Scripps Memorial Hospital Grand rounds in 10 days is a one hour lecture by the doctor who is head of HelloMD, national leaders in physician approval for medical marijuana, and in education.

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Anger at the destruction of the field of pain management. I posted on this two days ago, top left column. Anger at the greed in the medical system where pharma can buy whatever they want by sprinkling money at congress who will never ever ever do anything about the unholy prices of drugs. Certain elements in power will never stop trampling on the poor and the disabled. They will never treat the addicts. There is no will, they are paid off and nobody wants to help the disabled, the unwell, the poor. Not in  the U.S. Voters do not want to hear it.

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Anger says step back, surrender.

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There is nothing anyone can do. The swamp is exhausting, dirty, dangerous and black.

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I have tried 7-1/2 years to introduce a new paradigm. At various lifetimes in medicine, I have had funding, sat on boards of companies, and panels at FDA. I have witnessed the destruction of what it once was 43 years ago when I entered practice. A long and tortured history, but still the most exciting thing in the world is medicine, science. So what? They shut off the field of pain and are killing it. The world is the world. Always was, always will be. Lust and greed, says the sage. You cannot uncurl the curly tail of a pig, says the sage. Always was, always will be. Do your duty. You cannot escape it. But surrender to love.

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Surrender. Do what you can and surrender the results to the Infinite.

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Read these books:

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Dying to Get High, Marijuana as Medicine

by Wendy Chapkis and Richard J. Webb

NYU Press 2008

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From back leaf:

“How can a substance that is no mystery to half of all adults in the United States prompt such confusion and misrepresentation in the realms of law, medicine, and policy?…. Offering nuance in place of slogans, Dying to Get High tells an inspiring story of the tactics and philosophies of a little-understood health movement.”

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“A beautifully written account from the front lines of the struggle between a federal drug war complex determined to keep demonizing marijuana and the growing movement of patients and doctors who have found marijuana to be a valuable medicine.”

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“….. Provides a human element to the history, pharmacology, psychology, and politics of medical marijuana in a way that no other work has. I loved reading it.”

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Heroin Century

by Tom Carnwath and Ian Smith

Routledge Press, London

2002

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This is an extremely important, amazingly interesting, readable book for everyone.

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From back cover:

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Is heroin really dangerous? Or Is it just dangerous because it is illegal?

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Page-one 93,

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“The income of the drug barons is an annual $254 thousand million dollars, greater than the American defense budget.”

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Read this book. A page turner! Exciting! fast paced, awesome! mind boggling!

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And just because you might flash some anger to propel you to actually do something, don’t get stuck there. Be at peace. Work hard. Use your expertise. Surrender to the Infinite.

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While you are thinking about it, tell Congress to make pain management a mandatory course in more than the current 3% of medical schools, less then 30 hours in 4 years. Fund research and treatment of neuropathic pain such as CRPS, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome because it can be so disabling – the same neuropathic pain can occur from strokes. Don’t we deserve better? Not even cancer pain is taught, let alone grade schoolers who should be taught about the body, about addiction, drugs, sex. Teach all that opioids cause pain because they trigger inflammation in the immune system and that stimulates pain. The more opioid you give, the more the pain. Teach about the brain’s pleasure centers and addiction, how drugs and food and cigarettes work there and how addiction kills.

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Have a wonderful life all of you. There’s a lot of work to take up. You will meet great people. Can’t wait to see what a little anger will do.

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

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It is not legal for me to provide medical advice without an examination.

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It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

~~

Comments are welcome.

This site is not for email, not for medical questions, and not for appointments.

~~~~~

For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Please IGNORE THE ADS BELOW. They are not from me.

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Companies out of the pain business, NOT a hotbed of innovation, NOT COVERED by insurers


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Bloomberg news published this analysis below that explains much of the dead end in pain medication:

  • companies got out of the pain business.
  • there is no hope in sight for effective analgesics
  • insurers refuse coverage for more and more pain medications
  • insurers refuse coverage for modalities except opioids

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What kind of medical system:

  • forces patients to seek street drugs for pain relief because they are cheaper?
  • fails to treat addicts?
  • fails to allow cannabis (medical marijuana) one of the safest drugs ever discovered for pain and symptom management?

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The whole field is a sham ruled by politicians through CDC fiat and the justice department, subject to radical changes:

  •  a threat to your care
  • a threat to the field of pain management
  • a brick wall to any professional contemplating entering the field
    • pain management is complex & time consuming
    • most chronic pain patients have 3 or more pains
    • each pain requires assessment
    • risks patient addiction and/or suicide
    • risks loss of license
  • constant change
    • prior authorizations from insurers refused on appeal
    • disability refused for disabling pain
    • onerous computerized opioid database that is not nationwide, not fully completed by pharmacists
    • threats from patients, addicts, DEA, attorney general
    • highly politicized
    • good specialists thrown in jail despite expert testimony of foremost pain specialists – after testimony of addicts who reduced their sentence with lies
    • poor coverage of modalities if any for P.T., acupuncture, massage, integrative pain management, psychology, biofeedback, psychiatry, cannabis, compounded medications
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Here’s the article, click title to read in full.
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For the drug industry, building a better pain pill is a problem.

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Pharmaceutical companies have introduced new medicines to treat dependence, reverse overdoses, and deal with opioids’ side effects. But few effective and economically viable alternatives to addictive painkillers have emerged from the laboratory.

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That’s because of broken incentives, according to economists and industry experts. The payment policies of insurers and government health programs, along with pressure from investors, have encouraged drugmakers to treat the symptoms of the opioid epidemic but discouraged innovations that might get to the root of the problem.

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New therapies for pain have generally been too expensive, too cumbersome to use, or targeted at too small a group of patients….

 

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Different Incentives

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The incentives to develop a better pain pill differ sharply from those in other areas of research, such as Alzheimer’s disease.

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Drugmakers have spent billions on more than 100 failed medicines for Alzheimer’s, but a breakthrough would potentially reach a large and lucrative population of elderly patients on Medicare. Any new pain drug would be fighting it out with inexpensive, proven rivals in a politically fraught environment.

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The White House Council of Economic Advisers estimated this week that abuse of opioids cost the economy about $504 billion in 2015, or nearly three percent of that year’s overall economic output in the U.S. Those costs include health-care expenses, spending on criminal justice and first responders, and lost worker productivity.

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“There’s currently a lot more costs of addiction that are being borne by society in a more diffuse way,” said Kosali Simon, a health economist at Indiana University….

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Effort and Expense

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Most opioids are cheap generic drugs that have been prescribed for decades, making the effort and expense of developing new painkillers hard to justify.

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“They’re off-patent, they can be produced by companies that aren’t the original inventors,” said Bertha Madras, a professor of psychobiology at Harvard Medical School and a member of President Donald Trump’s opioid commission. “It becomes a much more expensive proposition to develop and get the approval for an opioid.”

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Drugmakers have instead invested in developing complex medicines for cancer and rare diseases, which can fetch six-figure price tags.

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“Companies got out of the pain business,” said Pratap Khedkar of ZS Associates, a sales and marketing consultant who studies the pharmaceutical industry. “It’s not the hotbed of innovation.”…..

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Wary Payers

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Drug plans have been reluctant to pay for abuse-resistant pain medicines, which often cost more and can be more difficult to administer. A recent report from The Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, a nonprofit that evaluates the value of prescription drugs, found that abuse-deterrent opioids weren’t cost-effective for insurers.

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At the same time, payers are limiting patients’ access to older pain drugsCigna Corp.took OxyContin off its list of preferred drugs for 2018, though it still covers other opioids. CVS Health Corp. said its pharmacy-benefits management arm will limit prescriptions to a seven-day supply, and Express Scripts Holding Co. also said it wouldcurb prescriptions.

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That leaves patients with a difficult choice. Abuse-deterrent painkillers might cost as much as $250 out of pocket. But generic opioids cost as little as $2, according to Denis Patterson, a pain specialist in Reno, Nevada.

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Abuse-resistant drugs get “denied 90 percent of the time. But the pain pills will get approved every single time,” said Patterson.

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“Shouldn’t it be flipped,” he said, “in that the things which can get people better should have better coverage?”…..

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

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It is not legal for me to provide medical advice without an examination.

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It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

~~

Comments are welcome.

This site is not for email, not for medical questions, and not for appointments.

~~~~~

For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Please IGNORE THE ADS BELOW. They are not from me.

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Cannabis Overwhelmingly Preferred over Opioids for Pain – UC Berkeley / HelloMD Opioid Study


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Congratulations and thanks to HelloMD’s email, posted below, that describes a new study. They are doing important work for people who can be helped by cannabis. We need help in the treatment of chronic pain.

I’ve seen pharma pressure pain specialists to refuse to treat patients who also use cannabis. For Pete’s sake it helps relax deep muscle like nothing else, helps anorexia, can bring up extremely low energy a tiny bit, helps depression, and pain. Shock and awe. What an awful thing to pressure doctors to do just to punish the plant based industry and extinguish the competition. I’m sure TV ads brainwash even more. Professionals in healthcare and politics need our help to know good studies already exist and even without that rigorous proof, our dispensaries can recreate what the world has safely used for thousands of years.

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HelloMD is a trusted source of information. 

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The HelloMD Advisor

Opinions from Industry Experts


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Hi Nancy,

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Yesterday we announced the results of our landmark study examining the use of cannabis as a substitute for opioid and non-opioid based pain medication. Performed in collaboration with University of California Berkeley, HelloMD surveyed 3,000 participants from our patient database….[– click on below link to article]

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[They showed the]

overwhelming majority of cannabis patients (92%) prefer using cannabis to opioids when managing their chronic pain.”

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Your participation in HelloMD studies is invaluable as it takes us one big step closer to showing healthcare professionals, elected officials and the public at large the potential for cannabis to alleviate the opioid crisis our nation is experiencing.

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HelloMD also recently launched in New York state offering patients the ability to get their medical marijuana certification online. This week we highlight PharmaCannis, a shining example of the eastern US cannabis scene, with five dispensaries statewide, professionals from the pharmaceutical industry, and an eye towards making cannabis a part of the future of healthcare.

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Finally, we highlight Dr. Gary Richter, the ‘Cannabis Pet Vet’, who has made it his mission to help animals and their owners lead happy, healthy lives.

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Be happy & healthy,

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Pamela Hadfield – Co Founder

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This is an important study for people to learn about and to help our legislators understand we need help to use this plant for billions who are needlessly suffering. We all need help. And simple is best. This medication has been safely used by grandmothers for thousands of years. Silly to think we cannot begin. Silly to deny millennia of use. We need help:

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  1. Low cost medication is essential.

  2. Healthcare insurers must reimburse patients for the cost of medical marijuana. This is done in New Mexico and should be in every state.

  3. We must all stop weaponizing a simple healing plant that can be effective. Truth beats fear. Every study helps to open minds.

  4. Support the work of good groups like HelloMD, NORML

  5. Get politics out of science and healthcare

  6. Teach our doctors – require 1 hour CME for all who see patients.

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I have so many senior patients terrified to try cannabis, and one who just had a once-in-a-lifetime result with a few cannabis drops under the tongue. She worked with a dispensary that mixed a personalized ratio of THC:CBD. It Worked! Nothing else had, her life spent in years of constant headache. It’s gone! yet she is still terrified of cannabis.

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Such has been the insanity about the American gung-ho opioid boosters vs the shoot ’em dead plant loving criminals and addicts – that’s what these little old ladies think they have become. Criminals and addicts. This sweet woman’s intractable migraine has taken her life every day for years, failing to respond to the best care in the nation, is now gone with cannabis! Yet she’s going to have a heart attack because for decades the GOP has trained her to think she’s a criminal addict. She was referred by one of the foremost migraine experts whose final suggestion was to try cannabis. A few weeks later when she came to her first visit with me, she was headache free.

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Had her family doctor been able to recommend someone who works with cannabis patients many years ago, she would not have wasted her life and fortune. It can be simple and life-saving to try, and always nice to have a helpful hand from the dispensary to show you how.  Again HelloMD helps with that.

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I am very grateful for HelloMD. For their great organization, a smoothly developed, simple, cost effective model that is affordable and convenient for my patients who are too ill to travel or simply too uncomfortable at the thought of hanging with a waiting room crowd so far from their better healed comfort zone.

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After all, they don’t look disabled, but I see disabled kids as young as 8 through 90’s.

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Do not judge disability by how someone looks. Young disabled veterans wearing artificial legs, have been attacked for not looking disabled when they park in disability spaces.

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Bring peace and healing to all whenever you can. Learn to use the plant and to enjoy the plant too. To be able to let off the weight of the world…. that alone is healing. Nothing is working right. Well, so what? Let go. We have to let go, let peace, breathe. You know you do the best you can as always, so now do the best and let go. Bring peace.

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Cannabis is a sacred plant. Treat it with respect. Fear is ignorance. Teach the truth. 

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“Democracy dies in darkness.”

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Bring peace and healing

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

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It is not legal for me to provide medical advice without an examination.

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It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

~~

This site is not for email and not for appointments.

If you wish an appointment, please telephone the office to schedule.

~~~~~

For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Please IGNORE THE ADS BELOW. They are not from me.

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Avoid opioid use in surgery to reduce postop pain


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Science for years has confirmed that opioids trigger inflammation and that creates pain. Trauma and surgery also create inflammation that leads to pain. How logical is it then to continue use of sufentanil for anesthesia when it is the most highly potent opioid 500 to 1,000 times stronger than morphine. Where is the logic in creating pain by using sufentanil as the anesthetic? A new one on the market will be 10,000 times stronger than morphine. Inflammation is not always easy to reset after you strafe the innate immune system with an opioid.

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Why is ketamine not used more often for surgical anesthesia when we know ketamine profoundly lowers the inflammatory response thus reducing pain more than ever. Studies for years have shown that even a small dose of ketamine reduces postop pain. This is not new.

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A study needs to be done comparing patients who receive no opioids. At least this study showed that when fewer opioids are used, pain scores are 37% lower than if more had been given. Patients given higher doses of opioid, had higher analgesic requirements postop. That increases the risk of persistent chronic pain and the tragic risk of addiction.

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Opioids inflict known lasting harm, pain and suffering, perhaps disability and addiction.

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Reduced opioid use in surgery linked to improved pain scores
Written by Brian Zimmerman

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After anesthesiologists at the University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville began administering fewer opioids to patients during surgeries, patients’ self-reported pain levels dropped, according to a study led by three UVA anesthesiologists.
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For the study, the team examined 101,484 surgeries that took place in the UVA Health System from March 2011 to November 2015. During this time period, the amount of opioids administered via general anesthesia at the system was reduced by 37 percent.
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For the same time period, self-assessed patient pain scores recorded in post-op recovery units dropped from an average of 5.5 on a 10-point scale to an average of 3.8, marking a 31 percent improvement.

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One of the study’s leaders, UVA anesthesiologist Marcel Durieux, MD, PhD, said the impetus behind the pain score improvements is likely attributable to several factors. One, previous research has indicated opioids can ultimately make people more sensitive to pain. And two, the increased use of non-opioid painkillers like lidocaine and acetaminophen during surgeries at UVA was likely effective.

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….”There is very clear evidence that people can become opioid-dependent because of the drugs they get during and after surgery,” said Dr. Durieux. “I think that by substantially limiting opioids during surgery, we’ve made an important step in addressing that problem.”

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.
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It is not legal for me to provide medical advice without an examination.

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It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

~~
This site is not for email and not for appointments.

If you wish an appointment, please telephone the office to schedule.

~~~~~

For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Please IGNORE THE ADS BELOW. They are not from me.

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