Memantine for Neuropathic Pain & Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, CRPS


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Neuropathic pain syndromes show an over-expression of NMDA receptors in the brain in animal models. Ketamine blocks the NMDA receptor. Another medication with the same mechanism, but in pill form is memantine. This report on six patients of the use of memantine for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) from 2007 in the Clinical Journal of Pain, six months after treatment with memantine, showed significant decrease in pain, improved motor symptoms and autonomic changes, and fMRI changes on the affected side improving, comparable to the unaffected side of the brain.

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It was approved for Alzheimer’s dementia gradually titrating to a dose of 28 mg/day, but for decades has been very useful off label for neuropathic pain including but not limited to CRPS, at a dose of 55 mg/day, and in recent years often prescribed for migraine.

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Ketamine is highly successful also for treatment resistant depression, and one patient, a psychiatrist disabled from the unfortunate triad of intractable neuropathic pain, migraine and treatment resistant depression, while slowly titrating to a dose of 55 mg/day, a process that takes almost 3 months, found depression relieved for the first time in decades at the dose of 35 mg. It was highly effective as one component of the multi-pronged approach for all three conditions.

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This life is a hard fact. We all need all the help, encouragement and positive attitudes we can get. Complex intractable pain and/or depression requires rational polypharmacy, selectively chosen based upon well known mechanisms, neurotransmitters, receptors, hormones, stress reduction, cognitive behavioral therapy, physical therapy, occupational therapy, nerve blocks, and spiritual understanding, etc. Several choices were summarized almost two years ago here.

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In my experience, memantine is very well tolerated with few if any side effects but covered by insurance only for mild to moderate dementia. Thus, not only is it highly challenging to treat neuropathic pain, but important to creatively meet the challenges of our backwards medical system that barely recognizes the needs of those with chronic pain.

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

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It is not legal for me to provide medical advice without an examination.

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It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

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Comments are welcome.

This site is not for email, not for medical questions, and not for appointments.

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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Please IGNORE THE ADS BELOW. They are not from me.

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Opioids increase risk of chronic pain – potentiate pain – faster, stronger, longer. Activate TLR4 receptor on microglia, blocked by low dose naltrexone (LDN)


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Professor Linda Watkins was the distinguished keynote speaker at the May 2015 American Pain Society annual meeting and gave the NIH 2015 Kreshover Lecture:

“Targeting Glia to Treat Chronic Pain: Moving from Concept to Clinical Trials.”

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The University of Colorado at Boulder describes her work

She has authored or co-authored over 190 book chapters, review articles and journal articles.

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Dr. Watkins’ research focuses on 3 inter-related areas. Her primary research interest is understanding how to control clinically relevant pathological pain states. Her group’s research points to a novel reason that clinical pain has been impossible to successfully control. That is, pathological pain is being created and maintained by a surprising cell type, namely glia. These cells, upon activation, dysregulate normal pain processing by the spinal cord neurons.

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Medical News Today published news of her recent study April 19, 2018

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“Opioids may increase risk of chronic pain.” They potentiate pain “faster, stronger, longer” and activate the TLR4 receptor on microglia. That receptor is blocked by low dose naltrexone (LDN).

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Opioids trigger inflammation in the brain and spinal cord. This is an elegant study by renowned Prof. Linda Watkins at the University of Colorado Boulder, with Peter Grace. His early work on LDN brought him from Australia to postdoc at her lab and now research at MD Anderson Cancer Center.

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“Having been used in one form or another for millennia, opioids beat pain into submission, quickly making the patient more comfortable. The latest study, which was carried out at the University of Colorado Boulder, turns this firmly held notion on its head.

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Senior author Prof. Linda Watkins, from the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, says, ominously, “[…] there is another dark side of opiates that many people don’t suspect.”

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In this case, it is not addiciton issues that Prof. Watkins is referring to. Paradoxically, opioids may actually prolong pain following surgery. The results were published recently in the journal Anesthesia and Analgesia.

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Postsurgical pain and opioids examined

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For the study, Prof. Watkins and colleague Peter Grace, of MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX, carried out laparotomies on male mice. This procedure involves making an incision through the abdominal wall to access the interior of the abdomen, and it is done on tens of thousands of U.S. individuals each year.

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“Opiates are really effective for acute pain relief. There is no drug that works better. But very little research has been done to look at what it is doing in the weeks to months after it’s withdrawn.”

Peter Grace

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Following surgery, one group of rats received the equivalent of a moderate dose of morphine for the next 7 days, while another group received morphine for 8 days, and the dosage was tapered off by day 10.

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Another group was given morphine for 10 days, after which point treatment stopped abruptly. A final group was given saline injections rather than morphine as a control.

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And, in another experiment, a group of rats received a 7-day course of morphine that ended 1 week before surgery was carried out.

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Before the morphine regimes commenced, and after they had been completed, the rats’ sensitivity to touch was measured, as was the activity of genes related to inflammation in the spinal cord.

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Compared with rats given saline, those that received morphine endured postoperative pain for over 3 additional weeks. Also, the longer the morphine was provided, the longer the rats’ pain lasted.

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The study also revealed that tapering of morphine dosage makes no difference. As Grace explains, “This tells us that this is not a phenomenon related to opioid withdrawal, which we know can cause pain. Something else is going on here.”

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How can morphine raise postoperative pain?

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The next question to ask, of course, is what drives this counterintuitive effect. Prof. Watkins calls it the result of a “one-two hit” on glial cells.

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In the brain, glial cells are more numerous than neurons. They protect and support nerve cells and, as part of their role as protector, they direct the brain’s immune response, including inflammation.

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The first “hit” occurs when surgery activates glial cells’ toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Prof. Watkins calls these “not me, not right, not O.K.” receptors; they help to orchestrate the inflammatory response. This first hit primes them for action when the second hit occurs.

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The second hit is morphine, which also stimulates TLR4. As Prof. Watkins explains:

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“With that second hit, the primed glial cells respond faster, stronger, and longer than before, creating a much more enduring state of inflammation and sometimes local tissue damage.”

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Although the study is in an animal model and will need replicating in humans, it does line up with previous findings.

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For instance, in 2016, the same scientists published another animal study, which found that a few days of opiate treatment for peripheral nerve pain exacerbated and prolonged pain. In that study, the activation of inflammatory pathways was also implicated.

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“An unusually high number of people end up with postoperative chronic pain,” explains Prof. Watkins. In fact, millions of U.S. individualssuffer with chronic pain. “This new study lends insight into one explanation for that.”

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Interestingly, the rats that received a course of morphine that ended a week before surgery did not experience prolonged postsurgical pain, leading the study authors to conclude that there is “a critical window for morphine potentiation of pain.”

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Because opioids are currently considered the best course of action to deal with postoperative pain, if these results are replicated in humans, it leaves medical science in a difficult situation.

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This is why Prof. Watkins is focusing much of her energy on designing drugs that could be given alongside opioids to dampen down the inflammatory response. She is also exploring alternative painkillers, such as cannabinoids.”

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

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It is not legal for me to provide medical advice without an examination.

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It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

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Comments are welcome.

This site is not for email, not for medical questions, and not for appointments.

~~~~~

For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Please IGNORE THE ADS BELOW. They are not from me.

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Spinal Cord Stimulation, Current Status 2017


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One of the top read articles in 2017 from the journal Pain (free pdf).

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Click title below:

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Current status and future perspectives of spinal cord stimulation in treatment of chronic pain

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Geurts, José W.a,*; Joosten, Elbert A.a,b; van Kleef, Maartena

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3. Complications and side effects

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“Complications and side effects (adverse events) acquiring reinterventions often occur during treatment with SCS.6,8,16,20,37 Complications include deep and superficial infections or equipment-related side effects like hardware malfunction, lead migration, fractured electrode, pulse generator discomfort, and battery replacements. Localized pain over the implanted hardware occurs regularly, on average in 6% of cases.6 This pain, for instance, can present as pain around the implanted pulse generator or over the lead. Such pain typically leads to replacement of the lead and therefore an additional surgery. Removal of the SCS system may be necessary in cases of deep infection or treatment failure. A prospective study performed over 12 years8 showed adverse events in 61% of patients. However, the complication rate was significantly reduced during the last 4 years of the study from an annual mean of 30% to 22%. The authors concluded that this was likely due to technological developments and improvements in the SCS hardware. Another explanation for this reduction is that the physicians treating patients gradually gain experience in a particular implant technique.22 New implantation techniques like DRG-STIM have been reported to cause more complications and it has been concluded that refinement and optimization of the technique are needed to minimize adverse events.22

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5. Future perspectives of spinal cord stimulation

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….”A point of concern is that, at present, cost-effectiveness of SCS is impeded by the high cost of the device and the high incidence of complications and side effects requiring reintervention and surgery. Consequently, SCS treatment is not accessible for everyone in the world and up to now is only available for selected indications.”….

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Among problems from spinal cord stimulators that I have seen in those with CRPS, the procedure has created a new pain that is now #1 most severe, often at the battery pack that is placed at the low back. Several patients reported units were explanted with difficulty due to severe scar formation.   

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Reference

[8]: Geurts JW, Smits H, Kemler MA, Brunner F, Kessels AG, van Kleef M.

Spinal cord stimulation for complex regional pain syndrome type I: a prospective cohort study with long-term follow-up.

Neuromodulation 2013;16:523–9; discussion 529.

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Objectives: Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is an effective treatment for intractable complex regional pain syndrome type I pain. Long-term data are scarce on effectiveness, degree of pain relief, predictors, and complications.

Materials and methods: From 1997 to 2008, 84 consecutive patients who received an implanted SCS system after positive test stimulation were included in the prospective study. Treatment effectiveness was assessed annually as measured by mean visual analog scale pain scores and with the Patients Global Impression of Change scale. Treatment success was defined as at least 30% mean pain relief at end point and treatment failure as explantation of the system. A Cox regression determined if baseline factors were associated with both these outcomes.

Results: During 11 years, 41% (95% CI: 27-55) of the patients experience at least 30% pain relief at assessment end point. During 12 years of follow-up 63% (95%CI: 41-85) of the implanted patients still use their SCS device at measured end point. Pain relief of at least 50% one week following test stimulation is associated with a higher probability of long-term treatment success. In 51 patients, 122 reinterventions were performed over 12 years; 13 were due to complications, 44 to battery changes, and 65 reinterventions were equipment related.

Conclusion: SCS provides an effective long-term pain treatment for 63% (95%CI: 41-85) of implanted patients. Forty-one percent (95%CI: 27-55) of SCS treated patients have at least 30% pain reduction at measurement end point. The number of reinterventions after implantation due to equipment-related problems, battery changes, and complications is 122 over 12 years of follow-up. Sixty-one percent (N = 51) of the patients had at least one reintervention. Mean pain relief of at least 50% (visual analog scale) one week after the test stimulation is associated with long-term treatment success.

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

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It is not legal for me to provide medical advice without an examination.

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It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

~~

Comments are welcome.

This site is not for email, not for medical questions, and not for appointments.

~~~~~

For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Please IGNORE THE ADS BELOW. They are not from me.

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Spinal Cord Stimulators – Not Allowed to Sue Medtronic – Supreme Court Ruling 2008


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More than any other topic  readers seem to read and comment more about serious problems with the Medtronic spinal cord stimulator than anything else on this site, yet they overlook this post last week: 

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Supreme Court ruling 2008

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Riegel v Medtronic

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Patients Who are Implanted with High-Risk Devices

 

Not Allowed to Sue

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And the problems never get addressed. There is no accountability for the damage to spinal cord that so many experience—the spinal cord for Pete’s sake —and no research on the incidence of the many different problems. If complications were not severe, thousands would not care to search the subject.

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Perhaps a person with a legal background would discuss how that case was won.

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How can this possibly be right? 

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

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It is not legal for me to provide medical advice without an examination.

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It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

~~

Comments are welcome.

This site is not for email, not for medical questions, and not for appointments.

~~~~~

For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Please IGNORE THE ADS BELOW. They are not from me.

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Editorial from PAIN: Hijacking the endogenous opioid system


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Neuropathic pain responds poorly to opioids, often not at all, and may become worse with treatment.

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I have seen pain improve in many after tapering off.

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Then you must treat pain without opioid; it doesn’t just disappear, but it will not be as intense. This editorial explains some of the reasons opioids become a problem.

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Excerpted from an editorial in the current issue of PAIN

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[emphasis mine]

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[COT = chronic opioid therapy]

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…..This review highlights why we may see some of the more insidious problems that occur with COT, which are summarized below.

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Individuals on COT may continue to “need” opioids to replicate the functions of endogenous opioids that are no longer being released (or are in competition with the exogenous opioids). As the review by Ballantyne and Sullivan states, “a new homeostasis is reached that can only be maintained by continued drug taking”.1 Individuals on COT lose the ability to endogenously improve mood, decrease stress, and socially engage because the endogenous opioid system becomes inherently less responsive. In pain management, we know of this need for increasing opioid dose over time to maintain analgesia as opioid tolerance. But a similar physiological phenomenon likely occurs with any endogenous opioid function. Although we have mainly anecdotal reports from individuals who have been weaned off of opioids, the change in personality, social engagement, motivation, fatigue, and mood is often profound when individuals on COT successfully taper to lower doses or off opioids. These insidious side effects of COT would all be expected to inhibit individuals from maximally engaging in the patient-centric, disease management strategies that are now recommended for all chronic pain states.

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This may also explain why it is often very difficult to taper individuals on COT completely off opioids and underscores the importance of a slow, structured weaning protocol with appropriate psychological support. It may take months or years for endogenous opioid function to return to normal after cessation of opioids, or perhaps this system never returns to normal in some patients (as seems to occur in heroin addicts).5

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This paralysis of the endogenous opioid system by COT could render ineffective many other treatments that are recommended for chronic pain and that work in part via the endogenous opioid system. Many if not most nonpharmacological therapies for pain, such as exercise, acupuncture, and many other mind-body therapies are believed to work in part by engaging endogenous analgesic pathways that are partly opioid dependent.

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Opioids have acute antistress and antidepressant effects, and many of our patients with chronic pain are taking opioids chronically to medicate their co-morbid depression, despair or distress more so than to treat pain. Brain imaging studies indicate that many brain regions typically involved in pain and sensory processing are also involved in affective regulation. Patients having chronic pain who show higher degrees of psychological comorbidity or stress might therefore desire opioids because of their temporary salutary effects on these domains, rather than for their intended analgesic effects. We need to develop better cognitive-behavioral and psychosocial interventions that target the needs of the many patients with pain experiencing more harm than benefit from opioids, but still seek these drugs to reduce their affective symptoms.

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The endogenous opioid system may actually participate in the pathogenesis of some chronic pain conditions making this class of drugs particularly problematic for some patients. Many lines of evidence suggest that individuals with more centralized pain conditions such as fibromyalgia are particularly unresponsive to opioids, and the endogenous opioid system may be participating in the pathogenesis of these conditions.2,7 This has tremendous clinical implications because it means that we may actually make these patients’ pain worse by administering opioids. These same individuals may also be those at highest risk for prolonged use of opioids initially given for acute pain, both because they need higher doses for longer durations, and they are more likely to have the psychological comorbidities that drive unintended use and misuse.

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We clearly need to re-think the focus of opioid education and screening programs in light of some of these observations. After any exposure to an opioid, especially following the very common use in the United States for treating acute pain, patients can become addicted or can misuse these drugs to treat concomitant despair, depression, or pain elsewhere in the body that would not be expected to be responsive to an opioid. As we contemplate risk evaluation and mitigation strategies to curb further opioid misuse and addiction, we need to better appreciate these common alternate paths to unintended uses of opioids.

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We are not the first field to underappreciate the consequences of hijacking a critical endogenous system for one purpose, only to eventually find that there are significant consequences. Following the discovery of the endogenous corticosteroid system, Hench and others found that cortisone was an extremely effective treatment for rheumatoid arthritis, and this revolutionized our treatment of inflammatory processes. But it took several decades to fully appreciate all of the intermediate and long-term side effects of chronic corticosteroid use.4 Nearly all of these under-recognized issues were due to off target effects of exogenous corticosteroids on critical endogenous functions of these hormones. Although the short-term effects of opioids have been understood for centuries, long-term, high-dose opioids have only been advocated for a few decades. It is likely that we are now witnessing a similar clinical phenomenon, and as we increasingly appreciate the off-target effects of repurposing a critical endogenous system, the pendulum needs to rapidly swing back towards caution with prescribing a class of drugs that have a plethora of serious side effects other than addiction and death from overdose.

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

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It is not legal for me to provide medical advice without an examination.

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It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

~~

Comments are welcome.

This site is not for email, not for medical questions, and not for appointments.

~~~~~

For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Please IGNORE THE ADS BELOW. They are not from me.

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Anger


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Anger at the failure of our medical system to support research and treatment of pain, anger at failure of the few currently available analgesics, anger at lack of interest or funding from Pharma – it requires at least $10,000,000 more to finish one important human treatment before submitting to FDA – that’s just one study. Pharma does not care, the price is peanuts to them. At one point, a company bought it, intending only to bury it. They do that for rheumatology treatments too, both the innate immune system and the adaptive immune system are being ignored. What could be more powerful than the immune system?

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Anger

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Anger at the failure of most medical organizations to discuss cannabis, medical marijuana. Training in cannabis is imperative.

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I am thrilled that Scripps Memorial Hospital Grand rounds in 10 days is a one hour lecture by the doctor who is head of HelloMD, national leaders in physician approval for medical marijuana, and in education.

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Anger at the destruction of the field of pain management. I posted on this two days ago, top left column. Anger at the greed in the medical system where pharma can buy whatever they want by sprinkling money at congress who will never ever ever do anything about the unholy prices of drugs. Certain elements in power will never stop trampling on the poor and the disabled. They will never treat the addicts. There is no will, they are paid off and nobody wants to help the disabled, the unwell, the poor. Not in  the U.S. Voters do not want to hear it.

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Anger says step back, surrender.

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There is nothing anyone can do. The swamp is exhausting, dirty, dangerous and black.

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I have tried 7-1/2 years to introduce a new paradigm. At various lifetimes in medicine, I have had funding, sat on boards of companies, and panels at FDA. I have witnessed the destruction of what it once was 43 years ago when I entered practice. A long and tortured history, but still the most exciting thing in the world is medicine, science. So what? They shut off the field of pain and are killing it. The world is the world. Always was, always will be. Lust and greed, says the sage. You cannot uncurl the curly tail of a pig, says the sage. Always was, always will be. Do your duty. You cannot escape it. But surrender to love.

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Surrender. Do what you can and surrender the results to the Infinite.

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Read these books:

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Dying to Get High, Marijuana as Medicine

by Wendy Chapkis and Richard J. Webb

NYU Press 2008

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From back leaf:

“How can a substance that is no mystery to half of all adults in the United States prompt such confusion and misrepresentation in the realms of law, medicine, and policy?…. Offering nuance in place of slogans, Dying to Get High tells an inspiring story of the tactics and philosophies of a little-understood health movement.”

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“A beautifully written account from the front lines of the struggle between a federal drug war complex determined to keep demonizing marijuana and the growing movement of patients and doctors who have found marijuana to be a valuable medicine.”

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“….. Provides a human element to the history, pharmacology, psychology, and politics of medical marijuana in a way that no other work has. I loved reading it.”

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Heroin Century

by Tom Carnwath and Ian Smith

Routledge Press, London

2002

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This is an extremely important, amazingly interesting, readable book for everyone.

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From back cover:

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Is heroin really dangerous? Or Is it just dangerous because it is illegal?

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Page-one 93,

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“The income of the drug barons is an annual $254 thousand million dollars, greater than the American defense budget.”

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Read this book. A page turner! Exciting! fast paced, awesome! mind boggling!

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And just because you might flash some anger to propel you to actually do something, don’t get stuck there. Be at peace. Work hard. Use your expertise. Surrender to the Infinite.

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While you are thinking about it, tell Congress to make pain management a mandatory course in more than the current 3% of medical schools, less then 30 hours in 4 years. Fund research and treatment of neuropathic pain such as CRPS, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome because it can be so disabling – the same neuropathic pain can occur from strokes. Don’t we deserve better? Not even cancer pain is taught, let alone grade schoolers who should be taught about the body, about addiction, drugs, sex. Teach all that opioids cause pain because they trigger inflammation in the immune system and that stimulates pain. The more opioid you give, the more the pain. Teach about the brain’s pleasure centers and addiction, how drugs and food and cigarettes work there and how addiction kills.

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Have a wonderful life all of you. There’s a lot of work to take up. You will meet great people. Can’t wait to see what a little anger will do.

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

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It is not legal for me to provide medical advice without an examination.

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It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

~~

Comments are welcome.

This site is not for email, not for medical questions, and not for appointments.

~~~~~

For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Please IGNORE THE ADS BELOW. They are not from me.

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Companies out of the pain business, NOT a hotbed of innovation, NOT COVERED by insurers


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Bloomberg news published this analysis below that explains much of the dead end in pain medication:

  • companies got out of the pain business.
  • there is no hope in sight for effective analgesics
  • insurers refuse coverage for more and more pain medications
  • insurers refuse coverage for modalities except opioids

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What kind of medical system:

  • forces patients to seek street drugs for pain relief because they are cheaper?
  • fails to treat addicts?
  • fails to allow cannabis (medical marijuana) one of the safest drugs ever discovered for pain and symptom management?

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The whole field is a sham ruled by politicians through CDC fiat and the justice department, subject to radical changes:

  •  a threat to your care
  • a threat to the field of pain management
  • a brick wall to any professional contemplating entering the field
    • pain management is complex & time consuming
    • most chronic pain patients have 3 or more pains
    • each pain requires assessment
    • risks patient addiction and/or suicide
    • risks loss of license
  • constant change
    • prior authorizations from insurers refused on appeal
    • disability refused for disabling pain
    • onerous computerized opioid database that is not nationwide, not fully completed by pharmacists
    • threats from patients, addicts, DEA, attorney general
    • highly politicized
    • good specialists thrown in jail despite expert testimony of foremost pain specialists – after testimony of addicts who reduced their sentence with lies
    • poor coverage of modalities if any for P.T., acupuncture, massage, integrative pain management, psychology, biofeedback, psychiatry, cannabis, compounded medications
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Here’s the article, click title to read in full.
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For the drug industry, building a better pain pill is a problem.

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Pharmaceutical companies have introduced new medicines to treat dependence, reverse overdoses, and deal with opioids’ side effects. But few effective and economically viable alternatives to addictive painkillers have emerged from the laboratory.

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That’s because of broken incentives, according to economists and industry experts. The payment policies of insurers and government health programs, along with pressure from investors, have encouraged drugmakers to treat the symptoms of the opioid epidemic but discouraged innovations that might get to the root of the problem.

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New therapies for pain have generally been too expensive, too cumbersome to use, or targeted at too small a group of patients….

 

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Different Incentives

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The incentives to develop a better pain pill differ sharply from those in other areas of research, such as Alzheimer’s disease.

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Drugmakers have spent billions on more than 100 failed medicines for Alzheimer’s, but a breakthrough would potentially reach a large and lucrative population of elderly patients on Medicare. Any new pain drug would be fighting it out with inexpensive, proven rivals in a politically fraught environment.

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The White House Council of Economic Advisers estimated this week that abuse of opioids cost the economy about $504 billion in 2015, or nearly three percent of that year’s overall economic output in the U.S. Those costs include health-care expenses, spending on criminal justice and first responders, and lost worker productivity.

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“There’s currently a lot more costs of addiction that are being borne by society in a more diffuse way,” said Kosali Simon, a health economist at Indiana University….

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Effort and Expense

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Most opioids are cheap generic drugs that have been prescribed for decades, making the effort and expense of developing new painkillers hard to justify.

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“They’re off-patent, they can be produced by companies that aren’t the original inventors,” said Bertha Madras, a professor of psychobiology at Harvard Medical School and a member of President Donald Trump’s opioid commission. “It becomes a much more expensive proposition to develop and get the approval for an opioid.”

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Drugmakers have instead invested in developing complex medicines for cancer and rare diseases, which can fetch six-figure price tags.

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“Companies got out of the pain business,” said Pratap Khedkar of ZS Associates, a sales and marketing consultant who studies the pharmaceutical industry. “It’s not the hotbed of innovation.”…..

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Wary Payers

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Drug plans have been reluctant to pay for abuse-resistant pain medicines, which often cost more and can be more difficult to administer. A recent report from The Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, a nonprofit that evaluates the value of prescription drugs, found that abuse-deterrent opioids weren’t cost-effective for insurers.

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At the same time, payers are limiting patients’ access to older pain drugsCigna Corp.took OxyContin off its list of preferred drugs for 2018, though it still covers other opioids. CVS Health Corp. said its pharmacy-benefits management arm will limit prescriptions to a seven-day supply, and Express Scripts Holding Co. also said it wouldcurb prescriptions.

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That leaves patients with a difficult choice. Abuse-deterrent painkillers might cost as much as $250 out of pocket. But generic opioids cost as little as $2, according to Denis Patterson, a pain specialist in Reno, Nevada.

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Abuse-resistant drugs get “denied 90 percent of the time. But the pain pills will get approved every single time,” said Patterson.

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“Shouldn’t it be flipped,” he said, “in that the things which can get people better should have better coverage?”…..

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

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It is not legal for me to provide medical advice without an examination.

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It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

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Comments are welcome.

This site is not for email, not for medical questions, and not for appointments.

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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Please IGNORE THE ADS BELOW. They are not from me.

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