PeaPure – Palmitoylethanolamide for Nerve Pain or Migraine


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PeaPure is a glial modulator. It is available in Italy and the Netherlands as a food supplement and has been studied in multicenter clinical trials in Europe for several years. It is well tolerated with no side effects and is very helpful for neuropathic pain, headache, and osteoarthritis. It is anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective.

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Because it inhibits astrocyte activation and the over-expression of pro-inflammatory molecules and signals, it is being investigated in Alzheimer’s Disease.

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The mechanism of action of PEA was discovered in 1993 by Nobel laureate Rita Levi-Montalcini in her work on nerve growth factors. She found it is involved in metabolism of mast cells and published a series of papers on its self-healing effect of the body in response to inflammation and pain. Two recent publications from Jan M Keppel Hesselink, MD, PhD, and his colleagues at the Institute for Neuropathic Pain, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, describe case reports, one of which is the case of a woman with CRPS.

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The purpose of this post is to clarify dosing of PeaPure and how to take it for a sudden flare of pain. My apologies for failing to recall the source of these instructions which I believe was from the manufacturer and from here and here. The latter includes an excellent review of its mechanism.

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Description of PeaPure® 400 mg capsules
PeaPure® is a food supplement based on a natural and fatty-acid like compound.
The substance palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) is a physiologically active molecule that the body produces naturally.
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What the user should know prior to ingestion:
•    There are no known significant side effects.
•    PeaPure® can be taken simultaneously with other medicine. In case of doubt, it is recommended to first consult your doctor or a pharmacist.
•    Use during pregnancy is NOT recommended.
•    PeaPure® does not contain sugar, yeast, allergens, sorbitol, magnesium stearate, povidone or other ingredients.

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Dosage and administration – please refer to the manufacturer.

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UPDATE SEPTEMBER 2014

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It is with a heavy heart that I report this news:

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Palmitoylethanolamide is

now available only from the Netherlands,

sold as PeaPure, a food supplement.

  It is no longer able to be imported by a pharmacy, but we are hoping

that may change if we can interest a supplement manufacturer to make it available for the US.

Patent rights, attorneys are far beyond the resources of my local pharmacy.

 

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I have published this year, 2014, on the treatment of

vulvodynia and proctodynia with PeaPure and a topical cream.

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There are no studies to show us how often it may relieve nerve pain, but it is astonishing when it works. No toxicity, no side effects. Your brain makes it, plants make it. There is a growing literature on it and I have posted on some of its mechanisms. And in particular, its Anti-inflammatory, Analgesic, Neuroprotective Mechanisms.

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for

medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

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Please understand that it is not legal for me to give medical advice without a consultation.

If you wish an appointment, please telephone my office or contact your local psychiatrist.

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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Exercise, a natural pain reliever, can decrease pain, fatigue, stiffness & need for drugs


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What you can do

“Moving is the best medicine”

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For headache and neck and shoulder pain

As reported in the leading headache journal, Cephalalgia, office workers with headache, neck and shoulder pain took part in an education and relaxation program in an Italian study over eight months. They kept diaries and did posture and relaxation exercises every two to three hours. Compared to a control group, headache and neck and shoulder pain decreased by more than 40% and use of analgesic drugs was cut in half.

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For Arthritis Pain

Physical activity is actually a natural pain reliever.
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study published in Arthritis Care and Research concluded that regular exercise is effective in significantly improving arthritis pain.
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The in-depth study looked at the effectiveness of the Arthritis Foundation Exercise Program – formerly known as the People with Arthritis Can Exercise (PACE) program – to reduce pain and stiffness by keeping joints flexible and muscles strong.
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Participants reported a decrease in pain and fatigue, an increase in upper and lower extremity function, and an increase in strength after participating in the basic 8-week exercise program. Also, participants who continued the exercise program independently, beyond 8 weeks, sustained improvement in reduced stiffness.
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“The study showed that the exercise program is suitable for every fitness level, even inactive older individuals,” said author of the study Leigh Callahan, PhD, Thurston Arthritis Research Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “Many people believe the myth that exercise exacerbates their symptoms. The truth revealed in the study is that symptoms improved with exercise.”
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Exercising for joint health is different than exercising for heart health. People living with arthritis don’t have to sweat to achieve success. The basic 8-week Arthritis Foundation Exercise Program consists of low-impact routines with gentle range-of-motion movements that can be done while sitting or standing.
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“Even minor lifestyle changes like taking a 10-minute walk 3 times a day can reduce the impact of arthritis on a person’s daily activities and help to prevent developing more painful arthritis,” explains Patience White, MD, chief public health officer of the Arthritis Foundation. “Physical activity can actually reduce pain naturally and decrease dependence on pain medications.”
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The Arthritis Foundation Exercise Program is offered at basic and advanced levels and is available throughout the country in many convenient community-based settings. A detailed listing of classes in local areas can be found on the Arthritis Foundation’s Web site at http://www.arthritis.org.
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