Medications denied for pain today – Celebrex, Skelaxin, Morphine, Oxycodone, Methadone, Suboxone


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Happy New Year. Medications are denied for pain one month after you sign onto new insurance based on medications they cover:

 

Celebrex, a generic NSAID, less risk of GI bleed which is an increased in seniors day by day as we age.

 

Skelaxone, generic muscle relaxant

 

Lorzone, muscle relaxant

 

Morphine 30 mg ER, generic, denied 3 per day, well within CDC guidelines

 

Methadone 10 mg 3/day, well within CDC guidelines

 

Oxycodone 5 mg 3/day, well within CDC guidelines

 

Suboxone generic,  FDA approved for addiction in US but not for pain; approved for pain and for addiction in EU.

 

Does insurance cover cost of medication?

 

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Pain’s mill wheel – Rabindranath Tagore


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SICKBED 5, by RABINDRANATH TAGORE  

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November 4, 1940
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Under this vast universe
pain’s mill wheel rotates,
grinds planets and stars to powder.
Sparks flash, scatter
suffering on every side,
ash-webs from annihilated worlds
permeating in an instant.
In the mills of oppression,
in cells of luminous consciousness,
pikes and knives clank,
wound-blood spurts.
The tiny human body—
infinite, its power to face pain.
In the assembly of creation and annihilation,
this small vessel of blood
offered to the Tantric circle
reels, drunken, rapturous.
The clay cup of the body fills
with incoherent blood, floods with tears.
Every moment unfolds unending
worth to consciousness, invincible.
The body’s pain-hallowed fire,
the offering sacrificed to ascetic acts of stars,
is incomparable.
Such enduring vigor,
compassion without fear,
indifference to death,
such triumphant processions:
assemblies trampling beds of flame
to find pain’s limits—
on a fevered, unnamed pilgrimage,
together, from path to path,
penetrating caves of fire, to find care’s origins,
provisions of unending love.

First Published in The Kenyon Review, Volume 23 #2

(Spring 2001)
http://www.kenyonreview.org/roth

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Be the change you wish to see – or walk away. Money at NIH


 

 

A Turning Point

 

$$$$$ MONEY $$$$$

 

at NIH

 

May not come this way again

 

NIH developing

5-year NIH-wide Strategic Plan

 

 

 

Donate to organizations, below

They can provide feedback to NIH via the

RFI Submission site


 

 

 

John C. Liebeskind, 1935 – 1997, distinguished scholar and researcher, past president of the American Pain Society, had the radical idea that pain can affect your health.

 

Research decades ago by an Israeli team at UCLA and others had shown “that pain can accelerate the growth of tumors and increase mortality after tumor challenge.” Decades ago Professor Liebeskind lectured all over the country: Pain kills.

 

He wrote an editorial in 1991, summarizing a life’s work:

 

“Pain and stress can inhibit immune function.”

 

 

Quoting John Bonica, the father of modern pain management, he wrote:

 

“Bonica has long argued that the term ‘chronic benign pain’ (used in distinction to pain associated with cancer) is seriously misleading.  Chronic pain is never benign, he contends; “it is a ‘malefic force’ that can devastate its victims’ lives and even lead to suicide.”

 

 

Liebeskind continues, “It appears that the dictum ‘pain does not kill,’ sometimes invoked to justify ignoring pain complaints, may be dangerously wrong.”

 

Pain mediates immune function

 

Importantly

 

  Opioids mediate the suppressive effect of stress on natural killer cells,

 

 published in 1984, immune system.

 

Alcohol increases tumor progression, 1992, immune system.

 

It used to be news.

He did not live to see change.

 

People just want to go on doing what they’re doing.

They want business as usual.

 

 

After 1991, we saw the great discoveries of neuroinflammation, pioneered by Linda Watkins, PhD, the early understanding of the innate immune system, its involvement in chronic pain and depression, and a few weeks ago, a British team showed neuroinflammation in teens with early signs of schizophrenia and DNA markers.

 

 

Major Depression has the same neuro-inflammation found in chronic pain, often responding to same medications, in particular glial modulators – immune modulators. Now, perhaps early schizophrenia will respond to glial modulators, reducing inflammation seen on scan in teens, before they become homeless and burned out by antipsychotic drugs

 

Inflammation out of control destroys neurons

 

Fire on the brain

 

 

We must be the change we wish to see

 

It’s not just the Bern. It’s been starting. Forces are finally coming together. We want change. It’s been too much. Too long.

 

We won’t take it anymore.

 

I figure if I tell you about it, you might just mention it to someone to pass it on. That is all. One small action may lead to change. Activate inputs to the NIH strategic plan.

 

 

~ Action needed ~

 

Prices of drugs becoming unaffordable

No new drugs for pain or major depression

Research to repurpose existing drugs

Expose the politics destroying our compounding pharmacies

 

Above all

The #1

Major Priority:

Request NIH to solicit priority call for research on

Glial modulators of the

Innate immune system

 

 

Why?

 

Glia modulate

chronic pain, major depression

and almost every known disease

 

Glia are your innate immune system

 

Inflammation kills

 

 

 

 Stress kills. Inflammation kills.

 

 

Pain kills

 

In the 1970’s, Professor Liebeskind and an Israeli team at UCLA injected cancer cells to two groups of rats that had sham surgery. Cancer spread much faster and killed far sooner in the group with poor treatment of surgical pain.

 

 

~ Pain kills ~

 

He lectured all over the country

 

Forty five years ago

 

 

I’m gonna be dead before I see this country do anything but unaffordable opioids and the magical ineffective trio of gabapentin, Lyrica, Cymbalta to treat chronic pain. The devastating, blind, nationwide emphasis does nothing to address the cause: inflammation, the innate immune system gone wild.


 

 

Innate immune system in action

 

Untreated pain suppresses the hormone systems too.

 

Untreated depression – same inflammation kills lives.

 

Where’s the money?

 

We are the change we wish to see. It’s pitiful I am so lazy. Suddenly, too late, we may need something, but, aha, no new drugs in the pipeline.

 

 

 

~ Make a joyful cry to NIH ~

 

They are soliciting input from professional societies

 

If your condition has failed all known drugs for pain or major depression, then make a joyful cry to NIH, now, before they give away all that nice new $$$$$money$$$$$.

 

 

Follow and join

 

American Pain Society

 

 

International Association for Pain

celebrating 40 years of pain research

 

 

Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome Association

help for CRPS/RSD  

 

 

 

The key to CRPS/RSD pain will apply to all forms of chronic pain, in particular the most difficult form, neuropathic pain. RSDSA funds research into all forms of chronic pain, not only Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS/RSD). Their scientific board members are not funded by opioid money.

 

 

 

Exactly

what is the annual cost of care

as fraction of GDP

for the growing population of Americans on opioids

for one year, for lifetime?

 

 

People are dying from prescription opioids and those who need them find they don’t work well enough. Prescriptions opioid costs must be a huge fraction of the medical costs in the United States GDP. You are required  to see a doctor every single month each year, often lifelong, just for one opioid, 12 months a year x 30 years x tens of millions of people and increasing – a growth industry. Not even counting $600 a day for the opioid, what the cost of monthly visits for 30 years? Not counting the army of DEA, FDA, CDC agents watching the opioids like a hawk. We all have to be sharp, addiction is growing. Addiction aside, deaths from prescription opioids are shaking up the CDC forcing urgent change this coming month.

 

 

 

Opioids do not work well for chronic pain

We need better

It’s not just the $600/day price

They just don’t work

 

 

donate

 

 

Raise a joyful noise at NIH now or write back at us readers with comments and better suggestions. Tell others what you’d like to see. Which politicians do you know would be most interested in this at national levels and organizations?

 

You may never see this change unless you do it now. Other forces will get this new money.

 

 

Turning point now

May not return

 

 

We are at a turning point and we will fail to catch the sail that’s coming fast to carry all research money in their shiny big stem cell direction. They never look back.

 

 

There is so many medications we can use today, FDA approved drugs that can be re-purposed and applied to recent cutting edge science. Someone must pay to do the work to study this.

 

 

Re-purpose old drugs

 

 

Stanford just showed a popular generic drug improved recovery of stroke paralysis in mice to begin at 3 days rather than 30. Old drug, new purpose, of course more years of testing to confirm in humans. Brilliant team applying new science.

 

 

Request
NIH to solicit a

Special Invitation

for 30 good protocols to

repurpose old drugs

 

 

Hundreds of old drugs, already approved, could be involved in mechanisms we have recently learned about. Speak up or money will go to shiny new stem cells. None for chronic pain or major depression. No company will find this profitable – it must be funded by NIH. A popular generic sleeping pill can bring astonishing return from stroke paralysis.

 

 

Congress has not opened this new money to NIH in many long years. How often will there be extra money?

 

 

donate

 

 

Lawrence A. Tabak, D.D.S., Ph.D.
Principal Deputy Director, NIH, solicits you to

Review the NIH Strategic Initiative Plan and their

Request for Information (RFI) and the NIH website

and provide your feedback via the RFI Submission site

 

 

This is for “stakeholder organizations (e.g., patient advocacy groups, professional societies) to submit a single response reflective of the views of the organization/membership as a whole. We also will be hosting webinars to gather additional input. These webinars will be held in early to mid-August.

 

 

 

Be the change you wish to see

Donate to those organizations

to solicit the change you wish to be

 

 

 

Happy New Year

Rejoice!

There’s money at NIH

 

 

 

 

 

 

The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

Relevant comments are welcome.

If any questions, please schedule an appointment with my office.

This site is not for email.

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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

 

 

 

 

Opioids and Deaths – If Sloan Kettering Cancer Center Can Do It, Why Can’t My Hospital OK Herbal & Compounded Medications?


 

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Gina Kolata reports in NYT

on the breaking study by two Princeton Economists    

 

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The key figure

Screen Shot 2015-11-05 at 7.53.11 PM
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“The two Princeton economics professors — Angus Deaton and his wife, Anne Case — who wrote the report that is the subject of my front-page article today about rising death rates for middle-aged white Americans, have no clear answer, only speculation. But the effect is stark. Dr. Deaton and Dr. Case calculate that if the death rate among middle-aged whites had continued to decline at the rate it fell between 1979 and 1998, half a million deaths would have been avoided over the years from 1999 through 2013. That, they note, is about the same number of deaths as those caused by AIDS through 2015.”

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“…The dismal picture for middle-aged whites makes Case and Deaton wonder how much of what they are seeing might be attributed to the explosive increase in prescription narcotics.”

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“What’s interesting, Dr. Case said, is that the people who report pain in middle age are the people who report difficulty in socializing, shopping, sitting for three hours, walking for two blocks.”

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“Dr. Deaton envisions poorly educated middle-aged white Americans who feel socially isolated are out of work, suffering from chronic pain and turning to narcotics or alcohol for relief, or taking their own lives. Starting in the 1990s, he said, there was a huge emphasis on controlling pain, with pain charts going up in every doctor’s office and a concomitant increase in prescription narcotics.”

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“We don’t know which came first, were the drugs pushed so much that people are hypersensitive to pain or does overprescription of the drugs make pain worse?” Dr. Case said.”

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“Dr. Deaton noted that blacks and Hispanics may have been protected to an extent. Some pharmacies in neighborhoods where blacks and Hispanics live do not even stock those drugs, and doctors have been less likely to prescribe them for these groups. Dr. Deaton said.”

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“A black person has to be in a lot more pain to get a prescription,” Dr. Case said. “That was thought to be horrible, but now it turns out to maybe have a silver lining.”…..

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Commenter: “D. Morris 1 hour ago
“unfortunately it’s easier to get a prescription of Oxycontin, or legally buy a handgun, than it is to get affordable mental health care in…”

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My Comments are too long, need days of edits, no time to do.


We have so many inexpensive generic medications in allopathic, Ayurvedic, and complementary medicine that are never taught.

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It is cost effective for Universities to limit their instruction to Anesthesia pain that teaches procedures. Thank goodness when they work. But is that all we teach? I fear the answer is yes. That was all that was available in Santa Monica in the early and mid 1990’s, after UCLA closed the Anesthesiology Interdisciplinary Pain Management Center in 1991 – others closed nationwide. It is cost effective to teach and do procedures.

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Epidurals

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 Bread and butter epidurals have never been compared to the same steroid and local anesthetic injected to the adjacent muscle without putting a needle into the spine. It could be equally as effective, able to be done in office, without surgery and x-ray scheduling, but then it would not be a good income generator. Selective nerve root blocks and facet blocks can be very helpful. But are epidurals just flooding the area with the same effect as a local muscle injection? What are we teaching before we get to procedures? How many patients can afford to take time off from work or school for repeated costly procedures?

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Glial modulators, compounded medications

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It would help if MD’s were trained (with CME credit) in the use of generic medications to include glial modulators that mitigate the need for high doses of opioids. There is often more relief than expensive procedures and hardware can provide – which may not work or may be short lasting and unaffordable for many, either due to cost or time away from work every few weeks.

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Physical Therapy

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Good training in Physical Therapy would be the very first step, not by PhD’s who teach fine academic theory, but by certified Orthopedic Physical Therapists with decades of bedside experience are needed to teach therapists who have shown time and again that the most basic P.T. is not being done in this country. Even people with purely neuropathic pain often develop mechanical changes, splinting to avoid pain. That must also be addressed.   

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I do not mean to imply that opioids are not useful. But there is more to pain relief than opioids and I suspect it may not be taught at all. Opioids rightfully remain on the WHO list of ten most essential medications. But when you use them – and believe me I am a wimp and would not be able to tolerate pain, but when you use opioids for years and years, how effective will they be when you really need them far more?

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Opioids are essential for many of my patients and when they fail, when all drugs fail including opioids, I know one thing is on their mind, and it grieves me that this country does not care enough to fund more than a pittance for pain research. This country must do better. Nobel prizes are abundant in La Jolla, but how about translational research in the clinics where we try to keep patients functioning and able to return to work without opioids.

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Drugs do not address muscle

Trigger Points

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Any doctor can do simple trigger point injections if they knew how to identify trigger points, the classic spots on common overused muscles that mimic disabling knee pain or headache or loss of grip strength, yes a strained, shortened brachioradialis – not neurological but do MD’s know?  P.T. specialists too, I hope they know trigger points, but they are not always communicating them to me because I find them and they can be simple.

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Could they add the identification and training of doctors to know meaningful differences in types of physical therapy. They all should be taught by an Orthopedic Physical Therapist like Bruce Inniss who trained decades ago at Rancho Los Amigos, a national treasure center back then innovating care for the most difficult paralyzed, handicapped and publishing it. Not the fancy PhD theory that the newer P.T. grads know – good but not best. Why don’t all physical therapists know the basics Bruce finds every day —- the same basics that were never once treated in the 30 years that my disabled patients were forced to return to. They come from the best university specialists in the country, and they all groan when I say “P.T.” until the next day after they have seen Bruce for their “intractable pain.” Thirty years of lost life. Expensive, joyless, hoping for the worst, praying for the day you will be old enough for Medicare so you could afford care because it has cost you your life savings. I am grateful for academic researchers for their brilliance, their ability to tolerate an academic environment. Best of all I love their shiny new cardiology toys and Dr. Topol translating medicine over wi-fi. Lets not leave behind the basics.

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It shocks me to see some of the basic things were overlooked or not even considered in people who come to me, often seen by the best five pain centers in the country. Of course I rely on those centers who may be able to help my patients. But I am shocked by the omission of simple basics: physical therapy being a key ingredient. That alone could save lives and save our taxpayers billions if the investment were contemplated.

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Last week, the well respected pain specialist Joseph Shurman, MD, at Scripps, said that young Rehabilitation Pain Specialists were rare. Few are going into Pain Management from an essential field. It’s a tough field, changing daily.

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What about other things?

 Compounded medication

Botanical, Ayurvedic, Herbals

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Hospital and university pharmacy committees must begin to open their minds to highly valued compounded and herbal drugs made by respected compounding pharmacists. We all know the high volume thieves who delivered contaminated IV’s, and had  the cheapest prices that brought a bad name, but why stop beneficial interstitial cystitis infusions ordered for decades by the senior specialist in the field? This attitude against compounding and against highly recognized herbal and Ayurvedic preparations must be improved. For example, Boswellia sold by Gliacin.com points to studies by the headache specialist in Scottsdale who trained at the Mayo Migraine Clinic. His site has publications showing 7 of the most intractable Indocin-responsive headache syndromes were improved with Gliacin (Boswellia)..

Most notable in the field is the website and research by Sloan Kettering Cancer Center on herbals and botanicals. You can hardly exclude half the country from your hospital if they found relief at last?  Surely you must teach and know the effects of patient use on FDA approved medications you are prescribing.

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What happens to that patient, whose intractable pain

responds only to compounded medicine,

when they have to be admitted to hospital or rehab

for weeks where compounded medications are forbidden?

Do we make you worse to get you better?

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Hospitals and universities are run by respected seniors, whip smart, who have no experience with many tools that are essential to many in our population. They are rightfully very protective of our beloved high technology centers and want no lawsuits from unapproved drugs not sold by big pharmaceutical companies. Not all of us live in such rarefied privileged worlds in our daily lives. We already have the tools and could use many of them at home without burdening resources. I would love to see physicians on hospital pharmacy committees work side by side with compounding pharmacists and be protected by law for using such inexpensive medications. Insurers have stopped coverage for compounded medications in the last four years, finishing the job in June with Tricare no longer paying. Medicare never has.

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So goes medicine in this country. We all lose. We are reaching for bright shiny things that dazzle me too. Don’t forget to keep the basics, the first thing I learned when teaching at UCLA Epilepsy Center. Often, the basics were not omitted. Case solved.

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It’s hard to know what to trust in so-called alternative treatment, but we must begin to trust if we have evaluated the credentials of best providers. Can we not trust even your patient’s heavily documented history? 

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We must do better. It is costing too many lives. The study I mention, above, just published, is tragic and predictable. Just ask any of us who see this daily. Ask your neighbors and family.

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Politicians could give us a law to protect hospitals from law suit if they allow compounded medications from highly respected compounding pharmacists who are owners of high quality small trusted pharmacies — not those big ones without supervision, where quarterly profit is the goal. We must keep these precious resources of medicine alive so that only the upper middle class can afford them. Does everything have to have overpriced studies and FDA approval with publications by many peers? We all know what that did to colchicine pills used for 100 years for gout, taken 3 times a day. Everyone knew they worked. But if you are the 1%, you invest a little and you can charge $7 each, $21 every single day for just one pill for life, instead of pennies a day.   


 

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INTRACTABLE PAIN IS NOT INTRACTABLE

IF YOU USE THE TOOLS YOU ALREADY HAVE

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It is past time we start teaching tools for pain that many of us daily encounter. Teach to doctors and physical therapists at the very least, but bring it into middle school and even younger.

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So many people are forced to put up with lack of medical care, lack of jobs, lack of income, and disability from working in factories owned by the 1% who control care, often through worker’s compensation.

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Now insurers require ICD10 codes before pharmacy can fill an antidepressant. That feels like ICD10 prison, and this comes at the same time as 70,000 new codes – merely an extra 50 hours a week. Why is the MD not the judge of medication after due deliberation of all the details, all the failed drugs. Practicing medicine without a license has become the standard of care since 1990, out of the doctor’s hands. Now that and insurance will not accept a prior authorization for a low dose of 25 mcg patch the patient has required for the last ten years for their lupus, Sjogren’s, RSD, and painful neuropathy. We have all felt its claws.

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computer system errors may appear typing letters out of sequence – please forgive, no time to edit and finding gremlins everywhere, possibly in the opinions so dangerously passionate. We can do better America. You don’t have to take it. Step up! Vote for the ones who care about your well being.

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 , Ayurvedic, Herbal “

PEA Palmitoylethanolamide – “Glia & Mast Cells as Target, An Anti-Inflammatory & Neuroprotective Lipid Mediator”


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Another oustanding article on palmitoylethanolamide “PEA.” I have seen profound results with it relieving intractable neuropathic pain in a woman with CRPS for years, and I suspect it may help Major Depressive Disorder but that remains to be tested.

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I need to add that opioids create pain. One mechanism by which that occurs is that opioids create pro-inflammatory cytokines, which creates more pain. Patients may see no response to essential pain relieving medications untill they taper off all opioids and allow the system to stabilize. Otherwise, they will have pain forever and it may increase.

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Glia and mast cells as targets for palmitoylethanolamide,

an anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective lipid mediator

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Authors  Skaper SD, Facci L, Giusti P.

Mol Neurobiol. 2013 Oct;48(2):340-52.  Epub 2013 Jun 28.

Abstract

Glia are key players in a number of nervous system disorders. Besides releasing glial and neuronal signaling molecules directed to cellular homeostasis, glia respond also to pro-inflammatory signals released from immune-related cells, with the mast cell being of particular interest. A proposed mast cell-glia communication may open new perspectives for designing therapies to target neuroinflammation by differentially modulating activation of non-neuronal cells normally controlling neuronal sensitization-both peripherally and centrally. Mast cells and glia possess endogenous homeostatic mechanisms/molecules that can be upregulated as a result of tissue damage or stimulation of inflammatory responses. Such molecules include the N-acylethanolamines, whose principal family members are the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoylethanolamine (anandamide), and its congeners N-stearoylethanolamine, N-oleoylethanolamine, and N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA). A key role of PEA may be to maintain cellular homeostasis when faced with external stressors provoking, for example, inflammation: PEA is produced and hydrolyzed by microglia, it downmodulates mast cell activation, it increases in glutamate-treated neocortical neurons ex vivo and in injured cortex, and PEA levels increase in the spinal cord of mice with chronic relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. Applied exogenously, PEA has proven efficacious in mast cell-mediated experimental models of acute and neurogenic inflammation. This fatty acid amide possesses also neuroprotective effects, for example, in a model of spinal cord trauma, in a delayed post-glutamate paradigm of excitotoxic death, and against amyloid β-peptide-induced learning and memory impairment in mice. These actions may be mediated by PEA acting through “receptor pleiotropism,” i.e., both direct and indirect interactions of PEA with different receptor targets, e.g., cannabinoid CB2 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha.

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Oxytocin, Astrocytes, Modification of Amygdala Circuits and Pain – IASP Early Research Career Grant Report


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As a physician who prescribes Oxytocin [OT] and sees profound relief of many forms of intractable pain and/or relief of treatment refractory Major Depressive Disorder or Anxiety and Panic Disorder, this research on mechanisms is deeply meaningful and long awaited. Oxytocin is a hormone made in the brain, but also in the heart and other organs in women and men. It is rare to find work on glia and oxytocin.

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Today the International Association for Study of Pain announced the final report from their 2012 Early Research Career Grant:

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“Dr. Alexander Charlet of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) in Strasbourg, France, has submitted his final report for his project “Involvement of astrocytes in the endogenous oxytocin modification of amygdala microcircuits….”

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“Dr. Charlet’s project focuses on the functional consequences of endogenous OT release in amygdala microcircuits on nociception and pain. In addition, he aims to decipher the precise mechanism, cellular and molecular, by which OT exerts its action. Thus, the purposes of his project are to characterize in vivo and in vitro the effects of endogenous OT in the amygdala on pain-related symptoms….

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.….”In addition, he was surprised to discover that perceptions of his project’s importance grew once it was awarded and triggered future collaborations: a Marie Curie European Action Career Integration Grant and the French Initiative d’Excellence Attractivity.”

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“As a result, Dr. Charlet also received two major personal prizes: an award from Swiss Society for Biological Psychiatry in 2012 and award from the French Académie nationale de medicine with the prestigious Albert Sézary price in 2013. Finally, he has been recruited as a neurosciences permanent researcher by the CNRS and recently opened his independent lab.”

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

~~~~~

Please understand that it is not legal for me

to give medical advice without a consultation.

If you wish an appointment, please telephone my office.

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For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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Treatment for Pain Could Last Months: Botox & Tetanus Chimera Injection


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Professor Bazbek Davletov now at Sheffield University, UK, reports his research that is featured on the cover of the October 2013 journal Bioconjugate Chemistry. He hopes the drug will cost around £1,000 a year, making it cheap enough for use on the NHS. It is authored by a 22-person team from 11 research institutes, including Lincoln University UK based Dr Enrico Ferrari.

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Dr Ferrari joined the School of Life Sciences in October last year from the Medical Research Council’s Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, where he took part in the development of a new way of joining and rebuilding molecules in the research group of Professor Bazbek Davletov who was then at the MRC.

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Taking components of clostridium botulinum and clostridium tetani neurotoxins – known as Botox and tetanus toxin – they re-joined the molecule proteins using a ‘protein stapling’ technology targeting central neurons without unwanted toxic effects.

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Science Daily announcement:

‘Chimera’ Protein Could Lead to Drug Treatments for Chronic Pain

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Lincoln University, UK, heralds this promising discovery:

Scientists synthesise new ‘chimera’ protein which could herald future drug treatments for chronic pain

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“Scientists have manufactured a new bio-therapeutic molecule that could be used to treat neurological disorders such as chronic pain and epilepsy.”

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The molecule was able to alleviate hypersensitivity to inflammatory pain.

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“Dr Ferrari, who is one of the lead authors of the study, said: “The toxins were split into parts so they were unable to function. Then later they were reassembled using a ‘zipping’ system so they can operate in a safe way. The re-engineered chimera toxin has very similar characteristics to Botox and is still able to block neurotransmission release, but the paralytic effect is a lot less. We then added a tetanus molecule which targets the chimera to where the pain signals travel towards the central nervous system.””

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“Dr Ferrari added: “Many painkillers relieve the pain temporarily and have various side effects. The selling point of this molecule is that the pain relief could last up to seven months….””

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The material on this site is for informational purposes only.

It is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment provided by a qualified health care provider.

~~~~~

Please understand that it is not legal for me

to give medical advice without a consultation.

If you wish an appointment, please telephone my office.

.

For My Home Page, click here:  Welcome to my Weblog on Pain Management!

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